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Signs of decline
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2017 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GIC cuts losses of nearly $10 billion!
Hsien Loong has announced that GIC had cut its long term investment in UBS by 2.4% and taking a hit of $6-$7 billion according to some estimate. Some put this sum to be $8b! GIC is still holding on to 2.7% of its shares in UBS which means a paper loss of more than $7 billion giving a total staggering loss of about $14b!
When such numbers are rolled out, many could not imagine or feel the impact of such losses. They are just numbers. In fact many big fund managers playing with OPM are too immune and desensitized to losing such big money. It is other people’s money after all, no sweat, no responsibility, own pocket not hurt.
How much is $14 billion? The cost of paying our political office holders is reported to be about $53m a year. Let’s put these numbers into persperctive. $ 14b is $14,000,000,000, 10 zeros behind the 14. $53m is $53,000,000, with 6 zeros behind the 53. The sum of $14b literally can pay the political office holders for 300 years or till 2317!
This is how much we have lost, just on one bank alone. This is not a plate of char kway teow or even several peanuts. This is big money being lost. How much did WP’s town council lost? Or did they actually lose any money at all? Or how much the other town councils lost during the lemon bond crisis?
Take a deep breath and get a feel of the scale of this loss. We spent $32.b for 4 submarines, or one sub costs less than $1b. We could have 14 subs for free by not investing in UBS.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elected President – Another constitutional challenge
M Ravi has lodged his challenge to the High Court on the EP issue on the ground that it is unconstitutional. His premise is that the reservation of the EP for a candidate based on race is unconstitutional. Holy shit, how come no one knows that this is racist and is unconstitutional, that our constitution is happy and open to have race imbedded and enshrined in it as a holy part of the constitution? And no one could see anything wrong with this and only M Ravi could! Or is it that M Ravi is not normal thus can see the not normal thing or the rest of the people who did not see anything unconstitutional about it are abnormal or simply daft? Even the whole legal fraternity could not see anything wrong with this amendment to the constitution! Is this normal or abnormal?
Ravi said that the changes to the constitution are racial discrimination, positive or negative racial discrimination is discrimination. Period.
Cheng Bock’s challenge is more technical in nature, about how to count correctly. This is another uniquely Singapore thing. Unable to count despite our great teaching methodology in arithmetics for the school children is no laughing matter. It is a national trait. Perhaps the govt should consult the primary school kids on how to count and the proper and correct way to count. Oops, it is the AGC office that did the counting. I don’t have much confidence in the ability of lawyers in counting. They can talk a dead person to life but counting 1,2 and 3 seems to be a big challenge to them.
Ok, is there anything else that is unconstitutional and would there be another mad lawyer, oops, I mean abnormal lawyer to stand up and say it is unconstitutional and must be challenged?
How about the unequal rights given to some people that are supposed to be more equal because they are richer, run big companies and all the craps that have no real relevance or relationship to the dignity and integrity of the office of the Presidency? Should not everyone be equal under the constitution and no one should be allowed to claim himself to be more equal than others just because he got a few dollars more than others?
The regulation to exclude 99% or more of the population because of some ridiculous criteria based on money and position in society is foul, smelly like shit. How can the constitution allow this to be included and no one cries foul? The criteria are saying that the citizens are not equal under the constitution. How can?
No legal mad man thinks this is mad? Maybe this is the reason. All the legal men and women are not mad to think this is mad and unconstitutional. So it must be constitutional. All men are equal but some are more equal than others. And this is a core principle in the Constitution of Singapore. Four legs are good, two legs are better, or is it my aristocratic background makes me different and of better breed than the hoi polloi, so I can be a President and the cheap masses cannot?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jonathan – A wholly Singaporean workforce
‘In a 10 year plan announced during the new year in 1982, then-prime minister Lee Kuan Yew spoke of having a fully Singaporean workforce that was not dependent on foreigners by 1991.
His message: “A wholly Singaporean workforce without any work permit holder at all by 1991.”
“Workers we want to retain beyond 1990 should be those who will raise our level of productivity,” the late Mr Lee said. “We shall give such workers permanent residence with a view to citizenship. Then we shall have a more homogenous workforce, working together as a team, because they all feel committed to Singapore. Then the principle, from each his best, to each his worth, which has been the basis of our progress, will work under optimal conditions.”’
The above is written by Jonathan in a post in the TRE. The statement or intent of LKY then was for a Singaporean workforce with new citizens converted to Singaporeans which is what is happening today. The problem is the implementation and the quality Singaporeans that he is hoping to net. There was this assumption that the new citizens are quality citizens, not fakes and con men. What we have today are lots of fakes and con men being converted to Singaporeans. So instead of the ‘homogenous’ Singaporeans, read quality workforce, we end up with half past six Singaporeans passing off as foreign talent new citizens.
The second problem is that instead of a Singaporean workforce aka with new citizens, there are so many foreigners here in the workforce that are not Singaporeans but acting as drugs to give the economy a temporary high. And to keep this high, more foreigners or drugs need to be injected or the whole ponzi will collapse. As such, the ideal of LKY, of a Singaporean workforce or Singapore for Singaporeans is being diluted to the extent that Singapore is now for any Tom, Dick and Harry that could stroll in to steal the jobs of Singaporeans.
And the khongcums are hapless and could not see how to get out from this mess they have created except to keep pumping drugs into the system. But for how long?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheng Bock stands a chance to stand as a minority candidate
The entry of Farid Khan, a Muslim of Pakistani descent, as a possible Malay candidate for the next EP opens up a window for Cheng Bock to get in using the same route. As reported, ‘Although his identity card shows his race as “Pakistani”, presidential hopeful Farid Khan Kaim Khan considers himself “Malay enough” to run in the coming presidential election(EP) reserved for Malay candidates.’ Khan added, ‘I was born in the Malay village in Geylang Serai, the heart of the Malay community. And I adopted the Malay language, and when I studied in school, my second language was Malay.’
Farid Khan must have read the provisions of the EP in the Constitution and its definition of what constitute one to be a Malay and eligible to stand. If I can remember, it was something like one needs not be an ethnic Malay but must be accepted by the Malay community as a Malay, or by the govt committee.
So, how can Cheng Bock make himself qualified? He must act very fast. Get himself converted to Islam and become a Muslim. Show proof that he is very conversant in the Malay language, which I think he is. Change his lifestyle a bit more to be like the Malays. Get all his Malay friends to accept him as a Malay. If he can convince his Malay friends that he is a Malay, then all the obstacles in his way would be cleared, technically and according to the definition in the Constitution. Then he can tell Singaporeans that he considers himself a Malay.
It is not easy. The Malay community may not accept him. But he can try, just like Farid Khan and other non Malay or half Malay candidates. The Constitution is very clear that one needs not be a Malay but must be accepted by the Malay community as a Malay. Correct me if I am wrong on this interpretation of the Constitution. I would not seek a court interpretation on this. I am just a layperson trying to read and understand the Constitution, like Farid Khan and the other non Malay or partial Malay candidates are doing.
Thank you very much. How about this, President Abdullah Tan Cheng Bock?(Oops, no offend intended. Just looking at the possibilities. If Constitution can change, every can change to suit the Constitution).
PS. Cheng Bock has appealed against the judgement of the court counting Wee Kim Wee, an appointed President by Parliament, now also read as elected President or no difference according to the court. Appointed or elected, same same, no difference in law. We need to change our dictionary on the meaning of these two words. Would the students pass their English Language examination if they write appointed and elected mean the same thing, sama sama?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Malay President

The Constitution was amended for a simple reason of having a minority president, should there be no Malay, or member of another minority group be elected as the President over a 25 year period. The idea and intent were simple and clear to the Malay and other minority groups. You will have a chance when all else failed.

This simple but untenable proposition is increasingly looking like a bad dream coming true. And as the goal posts keep shifting, the issue of a Malay president is looking more like a farce when reality hits the roof. What is a Malay becomes a major issue to address.

With the ridiculous and extreme elitist conditions in place, hardly any Malay would qualify, and those that qualified are either partial Malay or ethnically non Malay in all counts taking the application of Mohamed Salleh Marican and Farid Khan as examples. Even Halimah Yacob is only half Malay at most.

The big question now facing the committee that is given the power to determine what is a Malay is to come up with a formula or definition on Malayness. As this is going to be a very serious matter that affects the Presidency and racial harmony, the last thing that this committee would want to do is to come up with something that is unacceptable to the majority of the Malay community. Suka suka business tak boleh pakai.

Other than being accepted by the Malay community as Malay, practising Malay culture and living like a Malay, the next big factor is the Malayness. How many percent Malayness would be considered as adequate or minimal to be called a Malay? 10%, 30%, 50% or more? Can one that is ethnically not a Malay, ie 0% but fulfilled the rest of the conditions be called a Malay? What about someone with race in the IC or birth certificate clearly stated as non Malay qualifying as a Malay? In the case of Farid Khan, his IC said he is a Pakistani.

There is this other controversy of foreigners taking up citizenship and in their IC it is stated that they are Malay when they are not. Can a person officially stated as Malay in the IC, but did not qualify in the other conditions be refused to be a Malay and thus disqualified?

This can of worms is getting serious with so many worms crawling all over the place. The whole intent and purpose of the constitutional amendment is for racial harmony. In reality it is becoming a very divisive issue facing the Malay community. How many Malays agree to the definition of Malay in the Constitution? The govt must not take the Malay community for granted. By their reticence it does not mean that everything is fine. Would they be seething with anger beneath should a non ethnic Malay be elected as the EP to represent them?

The Pandora box is opened and what would happen to this simple idea and intent turning into a Gordian knot and turning everything topsy turvy? A badly conceived idea, and rushed ahead for implementation, would have highly undesirable and dire consequences to the maker and the country as a whole.

What kind of joke is it if an EP election to elect a Malay President ended up with no Malay President or at most a half Malay President? Oops, this is not a joke but a very serious matter concerning the interest of the Malay community.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The race stated in your BC/IC tak pakai
Is the race stated in your BC/IC legal?

The issue of your race has never been so controversial, so ambiguous, so subjective and so disputable until this minority election for an EP comes into being. Everyone is now questioning what his race means to his opportunity to qualify for the appointment of the EP. While the heat is now on in how to define what is a Malay and Malayness, many have forgotten the meaning of race as stated in the BC/IC. Is this still valid and still legal? Is a person a Malay or Indian or Chinese or Others as stated in his BC/IC or is that person something else?

Going backwards, when a child is born, the most important decision and a natural thing to do for the parents are to identify which race the child belongs. This is instinctive and the real identity of the child that the parents want the child to be. They have consciously chosen, declared and made a decision for life for the child.

What is happening today is that this important decision of choice is questionable and may not be legal. A person with a particular race stated in his/her BC/IC could not be what was stated in the BC/IC. A Malay may not be a Malay or an Indian may not be an Indian, and so is a Chinese or Others.

Would this new development have any implications other than just the qualification to stand as an EP candidate? Many govt polices are race related like HDB, education, social organisations etc etc. When one's identity in the BC/IC is subject to question and challenge, what would it make of the BC/IC, an official document that tells the identity of a person?

Can the Committee deciding what or who is a Malay reject a person that is officially stated as a Malay in his/her BC/IC? Can the same Committee decide that a person that is officially stated as a non Malay be officially ‘accepted’ as a Malay despite what is stated in the BC/IC? How would such an issue be ruled in the courts of law should race be in question, is the person what he is as stated in his BC/IC?

The problem of this confusion of racial identity is not just about the EP but about a whole series of complex govt policies and regulations and the social fabric of the country. This is a problem that is self created and is not going to go away just by a few simplistic rulings by a Committee that now appears to have the right and authority to change the race of a person.

What is happening?

Would there be more stringent checks and conditions before one can register a child belonging to an ethnic group at birth given this new development, that parents cannot anyhow hantam the race of the child in the BC/IC when being an ethnic minority comes with exceptional privileges?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Malay is Muslim, Muslim not necessarily Malay
This controversy over what is a Malay and what is a Muslim has precipitated finally, thanks to the Constitution on the definition of what is a Malay or who can represent the Malay community as a minority President. According to Article 19B of the Singapore Constitution, "any person, whether of the Malay race or otherwise, who considers himself to be a member of the Malay community and who is generally accepted as a member of the Malay community by that community" is qualified to run as a candidate for the reserved EP for Malays.
The dichotomy between a Malay and a Muslim has never been in question or was a non issue before. It was not important enough or there was reason to want a clearer definition of a Malay and a Muslim. It is common knowledge that all or nearly all Malays are Muslim, with a few exceptions. For those Malays that are non Muslim, I am not sure if the Malay community still regards them as Malays or ex communicado.
On the other hand, all Muslims are not necessarily Malay. One can be a Muslim from any race or nationality. A Muslim can be European, Caucasian, Arabs, Pakstani, Indian, African or Chinese and living totally different ways of life. Ok the Singapore Constitution understood this and further clarified that a Malay is not only a Muslim but practises Malay way of life. The ‘otherwise’ in the Constitution is very extensive and inclusive to the extent that anyone not of the Malay race can be considered as a Malay if the Malay community, reads as the Committee set up by the govt, accepts the person as a Malay.
The big issue, what is this reserved EP all about? Isn’t it about the election of a Malay rather than anyone not of Malay ethnicity? A Malay is a Malay by ethnicity. Period. Though this is further complicated by mixed marriages, a person that has no Malay ethnicity in him despite him practising the Malay way of life and being a Muslim, is not a Malay by any means except by a round about way of interpreting what is written in the Constitution.
Coming to this big question of a Malay that is not a Muslim. Does the Malay community regard a Malay that is a non Muslim a Malay or no longer a Malay? What about the legal interpretation of a Malay? Is it by ethnicity or by religion? Legally, I would presume that Malay parents or mixed Malay parents that are not Muslims but chose to register their children as Malay at birth have the right to do so and no one can deny that they are Malays when registered. Things get more complicated should non Malay Muslim parents decide to register their children as Malay at birth. What would be the status of such persons legally? Malay or non Malay? Going forward, with the EP pie beckoning, would Pakistanis, Indians and Pinoys choose to register their children as Malay to take advantage of this loophole? Would the babas also do likewise?
How would this debate continue and would it lead to a better definition of what constitute a person being accepted as a Malay or would the definition in the Constitution be final and the end of the story? Is this mess necessary or can be avoided? There is no such problem before this minority EP thing.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Philip Ang – Beware Ponzi scheme may blow up soon
Philip Ang wrote a piece with figures to support to warn Singaporeans about the risk of the CPF Ponzi scheme blowing up. How reliable were the numbers he put up is debatable as what he could do was to extrapolate from the limited data available. The truth or data as to the financial health of the CPF money is not readily available. The soundness of the CPF savings is as good as the govt’s words, trust me, everything is professionally managed by the best managers money can buy, in good hands, and the money is safe. And it is secret. This is the most frightening part. When the data or truth cannot be told or concealed, should you be worried? Knowing how people like to parrot their achievements, and when there is no achievement to gloat about and no data to show, you better read between the lines and make your own conclusion.
The CPF is now like a secret maze, guarded with top secrecy and the public don’t really know what is going on except for some numbers put up occasionally. Is Philip’s concern valid, that this Ponzi scheme is about to blow up? If Philip is right, no Singaporean is spared and the consequences are grave. Imagine a whole life time of earnings of a few million people disappeared in thin air. Just hope Philip is wrong and everything is fine. Trust the govt that everything is fine.
There is another Ponzi that cannot escape the passage of time. This is the 99 year lease on HDB flats. Singaporeans are expected to celebrate SG100 in 2065, ie less than 50 years away. By then, many HDB flats would be at the end of their leases and many Singaporean HDB owners would see the value of their flats becoming zero. There is no way to cover up or avoid this rude awakening. The million dollar asset rich Singaporeans would turn penniless overnight comes SG100. Not only that, many would be evicted from their flats when the leases expired.
Still there is another immigration Ponzi scheme going on when more and more foreigners would have to be brought in to shore up the property market. The influx of more and more people cannot go on and on. It is unsustainable and must come to a halt. Then what? Another big bust.
With these 3 Ponzi schemes awaiting to explode, is the future really that comfortable, good and secure for Singaporeans?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PAP’s noble intent in the EP going awry
With all noble and good intention, the PAP went out of its way to change the Constitution, gathered some of the most prominent citizens in a Constitutional Commission to sanction the need for a Malay President and how important and critical this is for a multi racial Singapore. Unfortunately this whole scheme is looking to go astray and turning sour. The ground is so uncomfortable and the only people that did not see any problem with this whole thing are you know who.
The constitutional change is to ensure that a Malay will be elected as the next President, or an ethnic minority, after a lapse of 5 terms. And in this coming election it is loud and clear that it is the turn for the Malay community to elect one of their kind to be the next President of this island.
The change brought along high hopes in the Malay community that at last another Malay would be the President after a long lapse since Yusof Ishak was the first and last Malay President. There was exuberance in the community but with some reservations that the crutch mentality is going to plague them once again. But never mind, it is not their fault as the community did not ask for it. It was all the initiative of the govt of the day that wants to provide this crutch to give the community a lift.
All seems well and good until the search of a Malay candidate begins. And to the horror of the Malay community, they could not find an ethnic Malay qualified to stand for this election, at least till now. And all the three candidates were not Malay ethnically or were more dominant in their ethnic lineages in other races.
How would this EP go along when it is reserved specially for the Malay community, to be represented by a Malay, other ethnic communities not allowed to compete in this race, but in the end no Malay candidate is up for election? An election reserved for Malays but no Malay candidate except mixed blood Malays or even Pakistani!
How pathetic can this be? How ludicrous! How farcical! The whole scheme is to appease the Malay community, to make them feel that the community is not left out in the cold, they are not forgotten. Would the outcome of the EP election bring comfort to the Malay community if the elected President is anything but a Malay?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is a mule a horse or a donkey?
A mule is fathered by a male donkey and a female horse. And there is another permutation, a hinny is the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey. There is a distinction, a material distinction to have the cross breed known either as a mule or a hinny.
So is a mule/hinny a horse or a donkey? Using normal human convention, the offspring is normally referred to as of the same breed or lineage as the father. So if a father is a Chinese, Indian or Malay, the offspring will be known as a Chinese, Indian or Malay respectively. A mule should thus be called a donkey, to take the breed of the father.
And in the same manner, a hinny should be called a horse, to take the lineage of the father. In some ethnic groups, the lineage comes from the maternal side. So a mule would be called a horse and a hinny be called a donkey. Very flexible cultural practices.
No one bothers to ask a mule or hinny what they are or what they would like to be. Would a mule choose to be called a horse or a donkey, and likewise would a hinny choose to be called a horse or a donkey? What would they choose?
Under normal circumstances both would say anything also can. Can call them donkey, horse or mule or dinny, it does not matter. But when it does matter say there is a prize or a 5 year supply of the best apple or carrot to be called a horse or a donkey, would the mule or hinny choose to be identified as a horse or a donkey?
Things are normally very simple until conditions are changed when there are benefits or disadvantages attached to it.
So, is a mule or hinny a horse or a donkey? Answer, it depends.
If the prize is meaningful, substantial, and will go to a donkey or a horse, not only mule or hinny would want to be called a donkey, all the horses would also want to be called a donkey or vice versa. Pragmatism anyone?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

High Commissioner defends Singapore’s Elected President system
V Gopalan Menon, Singapore’s High Commissioner in KL, issued a rebuttal to Utusan Melayu’s false allegations about the reserved EP for the Malay community. Menon clarified that the President is elected with popular mandate, plays a key role in nation building, ensuring good governance, acts as a custodian to the nation’s reserves and also is a protector of the integrity of its public service.
Menon went on to praise the achievements of the Malay community and the progress they have made under a rules based and meritocratic system. He went on to say this, “It is incorrect to say that non Malays in Singapore have been given ‘priority and advantages’. We certainly do not have a race based system of benefits and patronage. Singapore will not tolerate the use of race or religion to promote ill will between different segments of Singapore society, or to undermine our institutions.”
Would Menon want to rephrase his statement about ‘race based system of benefits and patronage with the change in the constitution that reserved elections for minority races based on their race? With the reserved EP only for Malays in the next EP, we do now have a race based system of benefits and patronage. No? Would the Malay race still feel as proud of their achievements without crutches now that a reserved EP is created for them to be elected based on their race? Meritocratic?
Anyone think this reserved EP is like giving the minority races a crutch that would lead to a crutch mentality in them? LKY and his peers were unyielding and firm about not providing a crutch to any groups, and not to create a crutch mentality. Nowadays no one seems to be defending this position.
What do you think?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mahathir’s definition of a Malay
‘Mahathir simplified the meaning of being a Malay by saying to be a Malay, one has to speak the Malay language, follow the Malay customs and be a Muslim…. To be a Malay, said Mahathir, is no more an ethnic thing as today it is more of a legal matter.’
What or who should be the authoritative source of what is a Malay? Singapore’s has its own definition of what is a Malay. According to Article 19B of the Singapore Constitution, "any person, whether of the Malay race or otherwise, who considers himself to be a member of the Malay community and who is generally accepted as a member of the Malay community by that community" is qualified to run as a candidate for the reserved EP for Malays.
The encyclopedia, Wikipedia, dictionary and all the anthropologists would have their own definition of what is a Malay. With so many different definitions, the final answer for a Malay is that everyone can be a Malay and everyone can also not be a Malay.

A person can change his nationality, can change his religion, even change his father, but no one can change his/her racial blue print. Race is biological, You cannot change your DNA, at least for now until the scientists find a way to alter them. Then a Caucasian can be a Mongoloid or vice versa. A Negrito or Afrikaan can be Caucasian or whatever.
Race is not a legal matter but ethnicity, not even cultural, it is biological.
A chicken that can swim and quack like a duck and calling itself a duck is a duck, or still a chicken?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reserved EP for Malays – A status report
So far from all that we know, 3 candidates, Halimah Yacob, Salleh Marican and Farid Khan, are the likely candidates for the EP. And if I am not mistaken, all 3 candidates are likely to have ‘Indian’ recorded in their BCs or ICs as their race. I may be wrong, but does it matter if this is the case?
We are going to have a reserved EP specially created just to elect a Malay to be the President. Isn’t this the case? In this instance the 3 candidates are legally Indians if I am right and. I admit I did not have the privilege to look at their ICs or BCs. If I am right in this, would it mean that 3 Indians, legally speaking, are standing for election as Malay candidates for the EP reserved for Malays?
Would the candidates put on record what is their official race by showing to the people their ICs and BCs? Be transparent! This is the time for transparency. Or would it be like what Lawrence Wong said, ‘Our policy is not transparency for transparency sake. Our approach is that transparency leads to good governance’? In this case is transparency necessary or not, or does this EP not lead to good governance?
If the 3 candidates are legally Indians and standing as Malays in an election specially provided to elect a Malay, is there anything wrong? Is the legal identity of a person important in this case?
Don’t ask me for an answer. My view is not important on this matter.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chan Chun Sing - Govt prepares to pay a high political price

Below are parts of an article in Channel News Asia on what Chan Chun Sing had said at the Institute of Policy Studies forum on Sep 8. If you ask me for my view on it, I will say no comment. But I would like to add the phrase that was often used by the local politicians, 'If it ain't broken, don't fix it', to describe what this govt has been doing most of the time, especially on the appointment of a head of state, the President. It is one thing about fixing things, it is another thing when the fixing is about fixing a symptom and not the cause. And as for the real reason for this fixing of the EP, everyone has his own view on this. I am not sure how many of you agree with Chan Chun Sing, but I am sure many of you don't. Here is the article.

SINGAPORE: It will be a “hard journey” to convince people about the need for changes to the Elected Presidency and the Government will pay a political price but it is prepared to, said Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office Chan Chun Sing on Friday (Sep Cool.

Speaking at an Institute of Policy Studies forum on the Reserved Presidential Election, Mr Chan stressed that as a young nation, Singapore had to evolve its systems to adapt to its circumstances – not just to meet the “here and now” but also to anticipate and pre-empt challenges that may arise in the future....

“If we are all good politicians, we won’t and we shouldn’t do it,” he said. “No good politician would sacrifice his political capital for a problem that may arise in future generations. Most good politicians in the world would try to preserve their political capital for themselves to manage their current problems.”

“There are many conspiracy theories out there,” he added. “But for every conspiracy theory that is out there, I have a very good answer for you.
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“If it has to do with an individual, then there are many other ways,” he said. “And if it is for political gain, then surely we are not achieving it as you have rightly pointed out.”....

“We asked ourselves - PM, do we need to do this now? Because we had anticipated it would be a hard journey to convince people and we would pay the political price, at least in the short term,” said Mr Chan. “PM Lee’s answer will forever be etched in my mind, and that distinguished a politician from a political leader.

“He said 'Yes, we are likely to pay a political price. Yes, we may not have a problem here and now, but what if we have a problem 20 or 30 years from now? Will the fourth, fifth or sixth generation of leaders have the liberty, and the luxury of time and space for them to put in place a system?'” said Mr Chan.

Mr Lee, he added, had taken it upon himself to put in place a system to pre-empt potential issues from arising in the future. “Not for himself, not for his political capital, but always thinking about what this country needs,” he said. “We are prepared to pay the political price, because we think the future of our country is much more important than any political capital that we may have.”....

Read more at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/govt-prepared-to-pay-political-price-over-changes-to-elected-9199326
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
Posts: 13855
Location: singapore

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

EP - Why the stony silence

The PAP has been vigorously defending this controversial concept of a reserved EP for the Malays. Oops, let me correct my statement. The non Malay PAP ministers and what else have been working overtime standing up to defend this EP reserved for the Malay race that Chan Chun Sing said would cost a heavy political price. Hope the PAP still have some political capital to squander away.

Chok Tong was also very careful in his criticism of this reserved EP for the Malays and was quoted to have said, “The reserved election this year is quite unpopular with a large proportion of the population because it goes against the principle of meritocracy.” Is that all?

What is strange about this reserved EP for the Malays is the stony silence. Did anyone notice this? The defenders of this reserved EP for the Malays that is good for the Malays are mainly the non Malay PAP ministers and MPs.

Why are the Malay ministers and MPs so quiet about this sordid affair? Do they have anything to say to support and defend this reserved EP for the Malays? Or are they afraid or not sure that this thing is really good for the Malays? And this goes to the rest of the Malay community, the Malay community not defined by the PEC, out there. They too seem to be avoiding talking about it. As for the Malay ministers and MPs, is it a case of better not say anything than to say something and get condemned by the Malay community?

So it is now left to the magnanimous and charitable non Malay PAP ministers and MPs to champion this Malay cause. The Malay community must be very grateful for this unsolicited support from the non Malay PAP politicians and would definitely vote wholeheartedly in the next GE for the PAP for changing the Constitution to give them a Malay President. Otherwise, the system would not allowed the PAP to appoint a Malay as the President like they used to during the time of President Yusoff Ishak under the old system.

What heavy political price was Chan Chun Sing talking about when the Malay votes would now all go to the PAP? Isn't this the main objective of this constitutional change for this controversial reserved EP for the Malays? The Malays are going to have a Malay President with the blessing of the PAP.
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