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Rise of Superpower and Decline of another Superpower-Part 1
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*elle*



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:49 am    Post subject: Rise of Superpower and Decline of another Superpower-Part 1 Reply with quote

"This week's Sino-Russia summit highlights the rise of one superpower, and decline of another.

By Owen Matthews and Anna Nemtsova
Newsweek International
March 27, 2006 issue -

Vladimir Putin, like Russia's double-headed imperial eagle, has two faces. Both have lately been very much in evidence. At a meeting of G8 energy ministers in Moscow last week, the Russian president showed his Western visage, presenting Russia as a reliable energy partner and playing the superpower alongside the big hitters of the democratic, industrialized world. This week he travels to Beijing to cement a growing partnership with Asia's other booming authoritarian-capitalist country, China. There he will sign deals on oil pipelines, sales of sophisticated weaponry and nuclear reactors, and security accords reminiscent of the old days of Sino-Soviet entente.

----------------------------------------------------

Putin clearly relishes his—and Russia's—newfound clout. But his visit to China raises an interesting question: which of the two nations, in fact, is the real superpower? On the surface, Russia seems to take the laurel, playing an energy-hungry East and West to its advantage. Awash in oil money, Moscow has recently been asserting itself as never before in the post-Soviet era—involving itself in Iran and the Middle East, wielding oil and natural gas as a political weapon against its neighbors in Eastern (and Western) Europe and reasserting control over its near abroad from Belarus to Uzbekistan.

Yet for all its new bullishness, Moscow looks East with a fearful eye. The reality is that China is rising as a military power—thanks in large part to the $5 billion of high-tech Russian arms it buys every year. And long ago it surpassed Russia economically. Yes, Russia may be sloshing with petrodollars. But China's surplus of trade capital is even bigger—to the point that Chinese investment threatens to swamp Russia's dysfunctional economy, particularly in its impoverished but strategically critical Far East. Western G8 members may have objected, fruitlessly, to Putin's inviting China to the Moscow summit. But in truth, it's China—the world's fourth largest economy, with Russia just ahead of Mexico in 12th place—that has the greater claim to a place at the top table. "Russia is shifting from being a junior partner of the United States to a junior partner of China," says Dmitry Trenin, director of Moscow's Carnegie Fund.

Nowhere is China's growing dominance more evident than in Siberia, a vast land far larger than China itself but inhabited by a mere 30 million Russians. Chinese goods are everywhere. In Novosibirsk, the owner of a new hotel can't think of a single thing in the place that isn't from China, from the electric sockets to the beds and furniture. The town's citizens will soon ride to work on Chinese buses; in the markets of Khabarovsk bargain-hungry Russian babush-kas even know the Chinese names for the vegetables they buy from Chinese traders. "Everything we have comes from China—our dishes, leather goods, even the meat we eat is from China," complains Vyacheslav Ilyukhin, head of the Building Department at Novosobirsk's city hall. "Siberia is becoming Chinese."

But Siberia is more than just a market for Chinese goods. Its vast oil and gas reserves make it the ideal gas tank to power China's growth. Earlier this month Putin ordered officials to speed up plans for an $11.5 billion, 4,100km crude-oil pipeline from eastern Siberia to the Pacific Ocean that will eventually carry 1.6 million barrels per day to China and Japan. And Russia's state energy utility, Unified Energy Systems, plans to spend $8.2 billion to build four giant hydropower complexes on the Aldan, Uchur and Timpton rivers in eastern Siberia to help meet China's annual demand for 40 billion kilowatt-hours of power.

China's soaring energy needs would seem to put Russia in the catbird seat. But in fact, it works the other way. There's no denying China's need for Russian natural resources. By some estimates, China will look to Russia to supply 20 percent of its energy imports by 2011. Ditto for other resources like lumber and aluminum. But China is developing other sources of supply as well, like Iran and Kazakhstan for oil. Chinese companies have been buying iron-ore mines in Australia, as well as Canada's largest nickel and zinc mining company, Noranda. China isn't about to become critically dependent on Russia, while Russia is becoming dependent on China—which will account for half of Russia's energy exports by 2015, according to some estimates."
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*elle*



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:57 am    Post subject: Superpower Rises (Part 2/3) Reply with quote

Meanwhile, china is grabbing other Russian assets. Siberia is home to a vast and underemployed brain trust of technological and scientific talent, which Beijing is busily buying up. Take Akademgorodok, a Soviet-era suburb of Novosibirsk, home to 52 scientific institutes and some 18,000 scientists, including half a dozen Nobel Prize winners. Already, estimates Novosibirsk councilor Aleksandr Lyulko, 80 percent of Akademgorodok's income derives from China. And after years of post-Soviet neglect, the scientists of Siberia are only too happy to fill Chinese orders for everything from wind tunnels and soil analyzers to lasers, DNA labs and electron accelerators. "The West is wary of selling their technologies to the Chinese, so they come here," explains Vasily Areshenko, foreign-relations chief for the Siberian chapter of the Russian Academy of Sciences. "Our own government doesn't give much importance to science. We need China's money."

Story continues below ↓
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Moscow politicians have long talked about making Novosibirsk the heart of a new Indian-style knowledge economy. But while Moscow's promises have stayed on paper, Chinese cash is actually kick-starting a rebirth of Russian science. Krasnoyarsk's Institute of Solar-Earth Physics, for instance, has formed a joint venture with the Chinese Center of Space Science; in Novosibirsk, the Institute of Precision Electronics now makes high-powered lasers together with the Shenyan Technological Institute. Last year more than 400 Chinese scientists visited Akademgorodok, notebooks in hand. "China has an enormous interest in learning about new technologies," says Vasily Fomin, director of Akademgorodok's Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. "They say: 'Give us a scientist who can win us a Nobel Prize and we will do anything for you'."

That doesn't sit well with many Russians, particularly back in Moscow. Raised on history texts describing how Russia was overrun by Mongol hordes from the East in the 13th century, they are uneasy about the influx of Chinese money, goods and people. They worry about selling technology that China could use to create its own home-grown tech industries. "A long time ago we taught Chinese to put cars together; now they sell us their Chinese cars," says Vasily Fomin. Less-rational fears of Chinese domination are rife, too. Last month Russia's nationalist Rodina party introduced legislation seeking to restrict the number of foreign (read: Chinese and Caucasian) traders allowed to sell goods at Russian markets. The bill is not likely to pass, but it's an indicator of just how deep the undercurrents of xenophobia run. Rodina's leader, Dmitry Rogozin, has previously accused China of plotting to take over Siberia, if not by force then by demography, and he's called for new laws "to restore Russia's control over its borders"—specifically to stem the inflow of Chinese migrants, nearly half a million of whom already live in Russia. Russians should be encouraged to move to borderareas, he has said, to counter the Chinese "threat to Mother Russia."

Rogozin is not alone in his fear of the "yellow peril." In Novosibirsk, the proposed purchase of 100 hectares of land on the city's outskirts by a Chinese shopping-center developer for $1.6 billion has raised vehement opposition among local politicians. "Novosibirsk will become half Chinese," complains Ilyukhin. "The authorities are too blind to see that we are selling a piece of our motherland." Even elite Kremlin bureaucrats share some of these concerns. Chinese companies have been blocked from buying strategic oil and gas assets, most recently in December, when the China National Offshore Oil Corp. sought to buy up the remains of the once mighty Yukos oil major. And just this month, the Chinese-owned Sinopec Group, Asia's largest petrochemical refiner, expressed interest in buying Udmurtneft, a subsidiary of the private oil joint venture TNK-BP. But that, too, is likely to be barred. The Kremlin, it seems, will tolerate Western majors like BP buying up medium-size Russian oil companies like TNK—but when it comes to the Chinese, the answer is no. Clearly, Putin wants China's money, but not at the cost of giving Beijing control of Russian assets.

At bottom, the Kremlin is deeply conflicted about its emerging eastern partner. Despite their fears, Russian strategists, smarting from the loss of their cold-war superpower status, also dream of creating a Pan-Asian alliance as a counterweight to U.S. hegemony. According to a poll carried out by the liberal Ekho Moskvy radio station last year, 74 percent of listeners thought Russia should join in an alliance with China against the United States. "Together, we will be greater than the Americans," one listener wrote on the station's Web site—a fair description of the Kremlin's goal."
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*elle*



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:59 am    Post subject: Superpower Rises (Part 3/3) Reply with quote

Recently, Putin has been talking up the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, a loose security alliance that includes Russia, China and the Central Asian nations of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Its stated aim is to control "terrorism" in the region, specifically, Islamic militants who threaten a repressive but Moscow-friendly regime in Uzbekistan and who have fomented unrest in China's Muslim-majority Xinjiang province. But it's also dedicated to evicting the United States from its bases in Central Asia, which make both Moscow and Beijing uneasy. Putin has also been trying to position Russia as an Asian, as well as a European, power—to the point of formally requesting membership in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, headquartered in Jakarta. "Moscow is irritated by Western criticism," says Dmitry Trenin. "It's looking east for new alliances."

Story continues below ↓
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Already, over the course of regular visits, Chinese President Hu Jintao and Putin have formed a common anti-U.S. front on major diplomatic issues ranging from Iraq to, most recently, how to deal with Iran's nuclear ambitions. Hu will also seek to build on that common ground by lobbying for increased Russian support for its claims to Taiwan, according to one Russian diplomat not authorized to speak on the record. Last May, the two men ended a long-running border dispute after Putin agreed to cede 120 square kilometers of the 4,300-kilometer Russo-Chinese border to Beijing. Slowly but surely, Russia is being pulled into China's economic and political orbit.

Closeness to Beijing, though, poses as many problems as distance. Even at home, with its erosion of free speech, its "managed democracy" and growing state control of the economy, the country seems to be taking a leaf from China's authoritarian book. But that doesn't sit well with Russia's craving for recognition by the West, tangibly expressed by memberships in such clubs as the WTO and G8, whose members are increasingly grumbling that perhaps Russia doesn't deserve such lofty standing among industrialized democracies.

So Russia finds itself in an awkward place, stranded between two poles, east and west. As China's economic and political pull grows, so Western good will ebbs as the United States and Europe grow more outspoken about Putin's rollback of democracy and support for despots like Belarus's Aleksandr Lukashenka. Putin may be too canny a player not to recognize the danger to the east. But as it runs out of friends in the West, Russia may find itself with little choice but to turn its face to China.

© 2006 Newsweek, Inc.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is an interesting article on the changes in the geopolitical world map. The Russians and the Chinese would be readjusting their positions and influence, and so will be the Americans.

Below are some quotes from an article by Derwin Pereira reporting from Washington. His title, "US 'overstating' China's military power.

1. The study says the Pentagon and US intelligence have embellished China's submarine and long range missile capabilities to justify an arms build up.

2. The authors say Washington is engaged in a scare campaign with the aid of conservative think tanks and the media. It adds that the bottom line is in the numbers: The US has 10,000 nuclear weapons, while China has about 200.

3. But the report also says China needs to be more transparent with its military dsevelopment to avert US suspicion and hostile response.

4. Military planners always need a rationale...for why they must have new weapons or new strategies and plans. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union...the US has turned its attention to China to help fill the vacuum.

Report by the Federation of American Scientists and the Natural Resources Defence Council.


The above quotes summarise the US thinking and strategies and how it is doing it to benefit its defence industries and its influence around the world. They are using the Iran and North Korean threats, plus China, to create panic and fear so as to sell more arms around the world especially to Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

In the Middle East, the Arab countries too have to keep upgrading their military arsenals for all the drum up fears of Iran and Syria. But overnight Iran and Syria are no longer the Axis of Evil when it suits the US strategic interest.
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*elle*



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 8:02 pm    Post subject: America's paranoia Reply with quote

redbean wrote:
That is an interesting article on the changes in the geopolitical world map. The Russians and the Chinese would be readjusting their positions and influence, and so will be the Americans.

Below are some quotes from an article by Derwin Pereira reporting from Washington. His title, "US 'overstating' China's military power.

1. The study says the Pentagon and US intelligence have embellished China's submarine and long range missile capabilities to justify an arms build up.

[b]The US is paranoid about the "Yellow Peril" since the days of ghengis Khan. It is obvious to the simple minded that China's building up her "Defensive Capabilities", Not "Offensive Capabilities", just in case Taiwan manages to get the USA involved in attacking China for one reason or another. You cannot invade America with a fleet of submarines. These submarines is to keep US Aircraft Carriers far enough away from China's shores that they are "neutralized" and cannot come to the assistance of Taiwan.


2. The authors say Washington is engaged in a scare campaign with the aid of conservative think tanks and the media. It adds that the bottom line is in the numbers: The US has 10,000 nuclear weapons, while China has about 200.

Irrelevant argument.

3. But the report also says China needs to be more transparent with its military dsevelopment to avert US suspicion and hostile response.

It is so transparent even I can saee it. Americans must be blind. They cause the threat and they blame the other guy.

4. Military planners always need a rationale...for why they must have new weapons or new strategies and plans. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union...the US has turned its attention to China to help fill the vacuum.

Scare-mongering gets treasury funds. Unfortunately the libs are doing untold damage to US Homeland Security. They should be more afriad of Islamic terrorists than Chinese Christmas pandas.

Report by the Federation of American Scientists and the Natural Resources Defence Council.[/b]

The above quotes summarise the US thinking and strategies and how it is doing it to benefit its defence industries and its influence around the world. They are using the Iran and North Korean threats, plus China, to create panic and fear so as to sell more arms around the world especially to Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

In the Middle East, the Arab countries too have to keep upgrading their military arsenals for all the drum up fears of Iran and Syria. But overnight Iran and Syria are no longer the Axis of Evil when it suits the US strategic interest.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The yellow peril was an American created fantasy to frighten the ignorant masses. Initially, if I am not mistaken, the yellow peril was not about a marauding horde of Chinaman armies but poor peasants flooding across America for economic survival. When the yellow peril was invented, the Chinese were already a defeated people, disorganised, backward in technology and poor. They were not a threat to the West in the form of Genghis Khan's army. And they remained in that pathetic state for the whole of the 20th century.

Even today, the Chinese are no match to the Americans if there is a war. The Chinese are not that stupid or that mad to want a war with America. Only the Japanese thought they could beat the Americans.

And there is no need for a war as long as the Chinese can feed their people and raise their quality of life through economic means and trade. A military war with the Americans will wipe out the Chinese in no time.

If there is ever to be a war, it will be schemed by the Americans under whatever pretext, like they are trying to do in Iran and North Korea, and like what the Americans had done in Iraq.

No country would want to have a war with the Americans. Instead of the Yellow Peril, the Americans are trying to create another Frankenstein to frighten the ordinary Americans. They needed an enemy to glorify their military supremacy.

And they have succeeded in uniting and releasing the forces of Islam and made an enemy of Islam. This I fully agree with you, elle.
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*elle*



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 5:59 am    Post subject: THE YELLOW PERIL Reply with quote

It is interesting how the phrase "The Yellow Peril" conjures different roots for you and for me. I first heard this phrase spoken by a young German, and have always associated it with European origins, which is quite different from your views, so I would like to dig into this a little deeper. Here is one clip referring to Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1895, and this was how I have always visualized its origins.

Many sources credit Kaiser Wilhelm II with coining the phrase "Yellow Peril" (in German, "gelbe Gefahr") in September 1895.

While immigration of Asians was not a major issue in Europe, the rise of Japan as a major world power was a cause of anxiety for some Europeans.

In 1898 M. P. Shiel published a short story serial The Yellow Danger. Shiel took the murder of two German missionaries in Kiau-Tschou 1897 to spread his anti-Chinese feelings. In later editions the serial was named The Yellow Peril.


But the text that follows may be your impressions of the same phrase,

""Yellow Peril"
"Yellow Peril" was a racial epithet directed against persons of Asian descent that was fashionable in Europe and America in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Its historical roots can be traced to the persistent theme in Western culture that the barbarian hordes of Asia, a yellow race, were always on the point of invading and destroying Christendom, Europe, and Western civilization itself. This interpretation of history contributed to racism in the United States.


The above paragraph also supports my views that the phrase was a Western European fear of being overwhelmed by the Yellow Hoards from Asia, like Ghengis Khan did.

The spirit of this racial slur pervaded major aspects of American diplomacy, congressional legislation, federal-state relations, economic development, transportation, agriculture, public opinion, trade unionism, and education for more than eight decades. The Burlingame Treaty with China in 1868 encouraged the Chinese coolie (a source of cheap labor) to enter the United States to help build the Pacific railroads; however, these immigrants were denied U.S. citizenship under the Naturalization Act of 1790, which limited naturalized citizenship to white persons. Fifty-six years later, with the Immigration Act of 1924, Congress excluded nearly all Asians from the United States. Those restrictions were not eased until 1952 when Congress created quotas for Asian immigration and made people of all races eligible for naturalization.

In the interim, murder, personal and social humiliation, and physical brutality became the lot of the Asian residents, particularly Chinese workers in California and the mining camps of the mountain states. In the late nineteenth century, Chinese residents were targets of sporadic labor violence, which included boycotts and the destruction of Chinese businesses. In 1906, the San Francisco School Board ordered the segregation of all Japanese, Chinese, and Korean children in a separate Oriental school, an order that was rescinded a few months later. And state legislatures and Congress passed laws and entered diplomatic treaties and agreements dealing with China and Japan that were designed to halt the yellow peril. These acts focused on immigration restriction and exclusion, naturalization prohibition, limitations on citizenship, prevention of free transit, and denial of rights to land ownership. The specifics of the yellow peril mania are evident in the CHINESE EXCLUSION ACTS, passed between 1880 and 1904, and in treaties and enactments with Japan, especially the treaties of 1894, 1911, and 1913 and provisions of the Immigration Act of 1907. The yellow peril fear peaked with the Immigration Act of 1924.

Thereafter, in its most gross form the yellow peril declined, although it emerged during the early days of World War II, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the confinement of Japanese Americans in camps. Nevertheless, with changes and modifications evident in new legislation, such as the McCarren-Walter Act of 1952, and administrative actions based on the exigencies of cold war foreign policies, the yellow peril was absorbed by other social forces and concerns of racism in the United States."


I find this differences in perspectives between us quite interesting.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi elle,

Your German origin of 1895 actually came much later than the anti Chinese sentiments in America particularly during the gold rush and railway building era. And the strength of this myth was the strongest, if I am not mistaken, in western America.

And if you piece history together, by the 19th century, the Chinese no longer present itself as a military threat to any western nation. And since the isolationist policies of the late Ming Dynasty and the Ching Dynasty, there were very little adventures by the Chinese nor the Japanese overseas. The only Chinese that the west met during this era were the Chinese coolies, the brawn workers. Timid, prideless, aimless, just to eke out a living.

The yellow peril of conquering Chinese hordes just could not fit into the picture.

Cheers.
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*elle*



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 7:54 pm    Post subject: Again a different perception Reply with quote

rb, you are correct in seeing the popular perception and interpretation of "The Yellow Peril", accentuated by the more recent prejudices and fears in America and Australia. However, perhaps my perception is "pre-digitalized internet" and thus probably more archiac, but the follow except is more in keeping with my perception, although it does not in any way diminish your perceptions.

"The roots of the "yellow peril" stem from the time of Genghis Khan and Mongolian invasions of Europe. According to Marchetti, "the yellow peril combines racist terror of alien cultures, sexual anxieties, and the belief that the West will be overpowered and enveloped by the irresistible, dark, occult forces of the East."2 Since Westerners have limited access to knowledge about Asia and its inhabitants, Westerners have created this

fantasy that projects Euroamerican desires and dread on the alien other. Thus, as Western nations began to carve up Asia into colonies, their own imperialist expansion was in part rationalized by the notion that a militarily powerful Asia posed a threat to "Christian civilization."3
In the United States, this fear increased with immigration in the late 1800s. Many Asians came to the United States in search of work. Their work ethic and willingness to work for lower wages incited fear against this cheap labor as economic instability. In addition, as more Asians decided to take up permanent residence in the United States, the fear of miscegenation appeared. In addition to these fears which appeared in the United States, fear was growing in China. In 1900, the Boxers rebelled against Christianity, killing Western missionaries as well as the Chinese Christian converts. Thus, the "yellow peril" as "a sea of Godless heathens who would turn on their Western 'protectors' to torture and kill them" was born in the United States.4 With this idea reinforced in both China and the West, the media took off on this theme creating cartoons, comic strips, and movies using this theme of the yellow peril. "
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redbean



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PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi elle,

The Chinese and Yellow Civilisation have suffered for several centuries under this western myth of a barbaric and brutal people. And there is and was a concerted effort, culminating in an international strategy to outcast the Chinese/Yellow civilisation through literature and media to the extent that the trend of thought, of anti Chinese/Yellow civilisation, has become deeply implanted in all colonised and western influenced countries and societies. To these days, the Chinese/Yellow civilisation is still being held in contempt, mistrust, hated, abused, just like the Jews, by many natives in Asian countries when the Chinese/Yellow civilisation did not do any harm to them nor their countries.

These countries, including those in Africa, hated the Chinese for all the wrong and imagined reasons created by the West. They were the victims of western imperialism, colonisation, and economic exploitations. Their countries were robbed and plundered by the West. Their national pride and pride as a people abused when they were turned into subject people of the western empires or as slaves.

Now what did the Chinese do to these countries that earned them their wrath when the crimes against them were committed by the West? It was a successive and successful daily indoctrination of the minds of these simple and naive people that even today, it is very difficult to erase.

The modernisation and political systems that sprouted up in Asian and African countries were not the intentional gifts that the west gave to them but a product of history, an accidental reward that was not part of the grand western benevolent plan to save the Asians and the Africans.

How long will the Asians and Africans live with this Yellow Peril myth and how long will the West shake off their racist past to come to terms with the rennaisance Chinese/Yellow civilisation that will be as modernistic and also their intellectual equals?

The best news today is that China, Japan and South Korea have announced that they are working towards an investment pact for the East Asian and Asian region. This is good for growth and economic cooperation as against the American agenda of sowing conflict, mistrust, sanctions and threats of war.

The 3 East Asian economic giants must set their own agenda and work towards greater economic cooperation and integration. They must not fall into the American plan of sowing discords and generating constant tension and conflict among themselves.

Now, is it Yellow Peril or White Peril that the world should fear for?
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 8:14 pm    Post subject: THE YELLOW PERIL Reply with quote

RB, you are justified in feelings of hurt and rejection because of your ancestry. Unfortunately the coined phrase, "The Yellow Peril" will be around in English literature for generations and generations to come. It is part of the language and you have to accept it and not take offense with it's use.

The only way to overcome this slur is by example. And that takes time, but it is happening. If you behave above such slurs, and can set by example that you are above such demeaning insults, and that your behaviour and conduct is that of the gentleman in every way, you will soon show that you are a man to be respected. Stop! Nations too have to set by example their civilized behaviour and soon people will feel too embarrassed to cast such aspersions. So start now! This is why this forum is important, to discuss how we overcome such prejudices!
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi elle,

Agree. The Yellow Peril is a termed coined by the West but it has two separate consequences. For the ignorant masses, it is a racial slur and has been used carelessly by the laypersons.

Then there is the greater political objectives in which the term is used by national leaders in a similar way as communism is bad, or the Jews are bad, that kind of thing. And this influences the mind of the unthinking.

Like it or not, I have to live with it and with other derogatory terms that were invented by the West, yellow culture, yellow press, turning yellow, yellow peril etc. The constant use of such terminologies as proper usage even by people of the yellow civilisations, unknowingly, will only accentuate and perpetuate the negative perception of the yellow civilisation. Quite pathetic actually if the such terminologies are used unconsciously by the yellow civilisation themselves.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 2:30 am    Post subject: PREJUDICES Reply with quote

RB what about Hak Quai, Hung Mow Quai, Quai Loh, Tong yen, Tung Kuok yen, malau quai, and a string of others?
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi elle,

All these racial slangs and slurs exist among all races. And they will be spoken under all kinds of situations, and mostly by the mob. Of course the aristocrats too use them in their private conversations.

What is very damaging is a concerted afford by the media and an international conspiracy, designed or at times uncoordinated, that is pitted against the yellow civilisation. It is the same thing being churned out today against the North Koreans and its leader Kim Jung Il. We are reading everyday of pictures of him feasting or holding a wine glass as a decadent lifestyle vis a vis his poor peasant citizens. And the flashing of pictures of children claimed as orphans, and hungry and sick, but actually fat and rosier than anything you can find in many developed countries.

Today, the Chinese are still hated and very negatively perceived by many Asian and even African countries for no real reasons except the unconscious planting of an idea in the minds of the people of the world against them. Yes it will change. Even the Malaysians are waking up to the fact that their woes were committed by the West. Still this does not remove the centuries of stigma implanted in their minds through the media.

It is changing but very slowly.
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

redbean wrote:
Hi elle,

All these racial slangs and slurs exist among all races. And they will be spoken under all kinds of situations, and mostly by the mob. Of course the aristocrats too use them in their private conversations.

Such prejudices have existed from the beginning of time. The Torah, Bible and the Koran is trewn with such remarks.
What is very damaging is a concerted afford by the media and an international conspiracy, designed or at times uncoordinated, that is pitted against the yellow civilisation.

rb there are racist remarks against Blacks, Jews, Chinks, Pak Mah Lau, just about any one. That is the nature of man. He has to gain some self esteem by putting someone esle down.

It is the same thing being churned out today against the North Koreans and its leader Kim Jung Il. We are reading everyday of pictures of him feasting or holding a wine glass as a decadent lifestyle vis a vis his poor peasant citizens.

Well, what is the truth with Kim Jung Il? Does he drink heavily? Does he like his women? This has to be verified before we can say that the media is right or they are slandering?

And the flashing of pictures of children claimed as orphans, and hungry and sick, but actually fat and rosier than anything you can find in many developed countries.

There is no doubt that there is hunger and poverty in N.Korea. That is a fact!

Today, the Chinese are still hated and very negatively perceived by many Asian and even African countries for no real reasons except the unconscious planting of an idea in the minds of the people of the world against them. Yes it will change.

What have the Chinese done to endear themselves to other people? To many people they are an unknown peoples who do not seem to care a damn about anything except to make money. The western world sees the Chinese as Communists, i.e. anti-Christian. In many ways like the Jews. So what is so loveble about such a characteristic?

Even the Malaysians are waking up to the fact that their woes were committed by the West. Still this does not remove the centuries of stigma implanted in their minds through the media.

Please explain, "their woes were committed by the West."? What woes? Why the collective "West"?

It is changing but very slowly.

rb, it takes two to tango! You cannot blame everything on to the other guy!
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