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Blow, blow the Wind of Change!
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Prince



Joined: 24 Jun 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 9:50 am    Post subject: Blow, blow the Wind of Change! Reply with quote

The Wind of Change has started in the US but it has not taken effect yet. However, nearer home, the Malaysian people have decided and have garnered enough courage to show the world that nor matter how entrenched a political party or leader is in its/his power grab, it can be changed.

The state of Penang is now no more under the UMNO-led Barisan National. It is now in the hands of the DAP. And the BN has managed to get only a simple majority, no more two-thirds majority in Parliament.

Overall, the BN has been trounced badly, even in Sarawak and Sabah.

Can we see the Wind of Change blowing in the guts and balls of the kia-su (afraid to lose) and kia-si (afraid to die), good for nothing except complaining and complacency, Sinkees?

What are your views?
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
Posts: 13249
Location: singapore

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Prince,

Welcome to the forum.

The implications of the Malaysia GE are tremendous and I am starting to visualise what it can do for Malaysia and the lessons for Singapore and Singaporeans.

Yes it is a big defeat for the incumbent ruling party, thinking that it can remain in power forever and ignoring the feelings of the people.

Let me reflect more on these before I post more on the impact on us.

Cheers
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 10:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A higher level of political maturity

A glance at the winners in yesterday's election quickly reminds one of the numerous political prisoners among them. Lim Kit Siang, Lim Eng Guan, Tian Chua, and the currently in prison M Manoharan who won while in captivity. Then the indestructible Anwar Ibrahim, so corruption and sodomy stuck on his face, stood triumphantly on the rostrum with his wife and daughter, both convincingly won their wards. And there were many other ex political detainees who were and are going into Parliament.

What does all these say to the Malaysian political system or to the credibility of drum up charges of political detainees? The people were simply pissed off by such wild accusations, even if some are true, and chose to denounce the regime in power and their excesses to abuse power. Political criminals are no criminals. Fictitious political crimes are no crimes.

The Malaysian political system is much more mature than ours. The Malaysian electorate are much more mature than ours. The Malaysian ruling party, on this occasion, is also more mature than ours. At least they did not say their electorate is stupid to vote for the opposition. I will retract this if they start to kiss the kris and threaten violence.
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Prince



Joined: 24 Jun 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 1:06 pm    Post subject: Malaysian GE 2008 Postmortem Reply with quote

Malaysian GE 2008 Postmortem.

The Malaysian government suffered its biggest setback in nearly 40 years, losing five of the 13 states in elections yesterday.

Badawi was asked if he was under pressure to quit after the government failed to win a two-thirds majority for the first time since 1969.

But the pro-government New Straits Times website carries this headline: Election 2008: Barisan Nasional (the ruling coalition) holds on to seven states. That is like saying a part of the Titanic is still above water.

Indians, who make up eight percent of the 26 million population, snubbed the prime minister by voting out his Works Minister and leader of the Malaysian Indian Congress Samy Velu -- who lost the seat he had held for nearly 30 years -- and electing Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf) leader M Manoharan, who is in jail for organising the November 25 protest rally by ethnic Indians alleging discrimination in jobs, education and housing.

Abdullah now finds himself in a hostile capital like the former Thai prime minister, Thaksin Shinawatra. The opposition took control of almost all the seats in Kuala Lumpur, and the neighbouring industrial state of Selangor. Thaksin,however, had supporters elsewhere and is now making inroads again.

As for Abdullah, "I think the PM will potentially have to resign," said Bridget Welsh, a Malaysia specialist at Johns Hopkins University in the United States, reported Reuters. "This is unprecedented. The only other time this happened was in 1969 and that's why everybody is very nervous now because of the uncertainty."

Deady race riots broke out between ethnic Chinese and the Malays in 1969 when the government last failed to win a two-thirds majority.

To prevent trouble, police yesterday banned victory processions and threatened to use tough internal security laws against anyone spreading rumours. It was opposition victory processions that triggered the 1969 riots. But banning protest rallies, teargassing and arresting protesters like the police did during the November 25 peaceful protest by ethnic Indians, and rounding up people under tough internal security laws cannot win votes, as the government discovered yesterday.

Abdullah will form the next government as his ruling coalition won a simple majority: 137 out of 219 seats with three seats still to be declared. He denied any pressure to quit from his party, the United Malays National Organisation. "I don't know who is pressuring me to quit," he said, reported the pro-government New Straits Times. Defence Minister Najib Tun Abdul Razak, whom Arab News described as his main rival, retained his seat like Abdullah and several but not all cabinet ministers. Two others lost besides Samy Velu.

The National Front held 90 percent of the seats in the outgoing federal parliament after Abdullah led the National Front to a landslide victory in the previous election, in 2004.

The irony is, the prime minister need not have called an election at all, until next year.

Observers said he called an early poll to prevent the popular opposition leader, Anwar Ibrahim, from contesting the election. The former deputy prime minister, who was jailed on various charges after a fallout with the former prime minister Mahathir Mohamad, cannot stand for election yet though he was released in 2004. Mahathir had rows with Abdullah, too. So it will be interesting to hear what he has to say about the election results.



The BBC reports:

Our correspondent says there are many people who have as many suspicions about Mr Ibrahim as about the National Front's leaders.

Reuters gives a more detailed report.

The question is will Abdullah now reach out to the minorities or hang tough on pro-Malay policies? The indigenous Malays make up a little more than 6o percent of the population and not of all them support the ruling Umno party as the election results showed.

The Islamist PAS party retained the northeastern Kelantan state and also won shock victories in the northern heartland states of Kedah and Perak while the leftist Chinese-backed Democratic Action Party won Penang state, which houses many multinationals, reports Reuters. The Chinese make up 26 percent of the population, according to the BBC.

The DAP and PAS also joined Anwar's People's Justice Party, or Parti Keadilan, to take control of the industrial state of Selangor and almost all the seats in the capital, Kuala Lumpur. The jailed Indian Hindraf leader Manoharan won from Selangor as a DAP candidate.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
Posts: 13249
Location: singapore

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A creepy silence

Two days have passed without any incidents. The silence of Khairy and Hishammuddin and their likes is quiet creepy. Let's hope they take the decision of the people in their stride and reflect on why UMNO lost. They have contributed a great part to this debacle. They got corrupted with power in their head.

Mahathir is happily blaming Abdullah for his ineffectiveness. Actually the person that needs to be blamed, the one who seeded all the nonsense in Malaysian politics is Mahathir himself. He orchestrated everything and set the tone for what was Malaysian politics during his reign. He allowed all kinds of excesses to run wild, and this is the result of his bad management.

The politicians have had a ball of a time lining their pockets. The judiciary was in his pocket and beholden to him. The whole govt machinery were run by UMNO for the interests of the politicians. Corruption was rampant but accepted as the way of things.

The irony now is that the stone he cast away, will now be seen as the possible saviour of Malaysia. In Anwar Ibrahim there is hope that there will be a new Malaysia for all Malaysians. No, it was not Abdullah's fault. He inherited the mess and all the cronies. UMNO is doomed and need to be cut down to size, minus the opportunists of course.

Are we going to see a run on UMNO, MIC, MCA and Gerakan? Will the defection becomes a runaway avalanche? The party is over for UMNO.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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Location: singapore

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Malaysians have shown the way

It is possible to bring down an over confident ruling party. The Malaysians have done it, though the ruling party was not brought down yet, but the writing is on the wall. The facade of infallibility has been breached. All it needs is a confluence of many factors, big and small. Together they will tip the scale.

The situation and conditions in Malaysia are quite similar except appearing in different hues. Removing the distractions, they are the same kinds of problem facing the people. And they have a few foolish ministers and some good for nothing ministers to help the people made up their minds.

In our past elections, our ministers were the pillars of strength to lift or carry an entire GRC based on their reputation and weight. Would this assumption still holds true? In my observation, some are becoming a liability to the GRCs. They will bring down the GRCs instead. That is how bad things have changed.

The momentum and direction have been set by the Malaysians. There is a high probability that they will be emulated here, in the next GE.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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Location: singapore

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Malaysia's rite of passage

Below is a comment by Shad Saleem Faruqi in the Mypaper which I find very relevant.

New Politics

'The electorate is not, any more, swayed exclusively by racial and religious appeal. The old technique of appealing to people's fear and insecurities did not work. The feudal hold of party overlords seems to have weakened. The Malay electorate seems to have cast off traditional loyalties.

A maturing electorate saw through all the political rhetoric, the issues of corruption, arrogance of power and price rises....

The voting population has demonstrated that there are limits to its gullibility.'

Shad is a Professor of Law at Universiti Teknologi Mara.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pertinent lessons from Malaysia

Below are 3 lessons which I fully agree with PN Balji of the Today paper.

Lesson 1: A good leader must lead from the front, especially when it comes to important issues.

Lesson 2: Be discerning when listening to views and trust the right people. Finally ownership. It is now 5 days since the electoral hammering....It is time for Abdullah to own up to the damage inflicted on his party and the people who had pinned their hopes on him.

Lesson 3: Accept responsibility, assess the mood of the people and decide how to move on.

What a good piece of lesson and what a nice timing.
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Prince



Joined: 24 Jun 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Expecting the die-hard elitist leaders to change is like knocking our heads
against iron. They would rather take care of their own iron rice bowl than
to care or notice what the people are trying to tell them.

The rich will look after the rich.
The elites will look after the elites.
The scholars will look after the scholars.

Only the commoners will look after the commoners, whom the MM branded
as "losers" in the latest interview he gave to a US correspondent, released
recently:


http://app.sprinter.gov.sg/data/pr/20080215994.htm

Quote:

Q: “But you do see the abuses of the system everyday turning off the
people generally.”

Mr Lee: “Yes, of course.”

Q: “I mean, I never forget this man from Goldman Sachs was given
US$70 million as a Christmas bonus, not this last Christmas, the Christmas
before. He turned it down. He said, I’m worth US$100 million and he
walked out and he’s now a hedge fund manager who makes US$300
million in one year. You see this happening more and more and that’s
why I think the Democrats are coming back.”

Mr Lee: “They can’t stop this, you see. Look, I’m the Chairman of our
pension fund, called the GIC. The people who manage that and are
deciding where we put our money on equities, on bonds or private
equity…“

Q: “That’s you sovereign wealth fund, right?”

Mr Lee: “Yeah. They are paid five times what I’m paid. Why? If not,
they will just walk out and join the next, any number of financial
institutions that want their skills. But they are dealing with billions
everyday. So, your sense of proportion, if I am making you, by this
one transaction, a 20 per cent gain just by staying in this, I mean, what
do I get? And I could easily lose your 20 per cent.”

Q: “So, you think that’s an inevitable part of the system.”

Mr Lee: “No, these are the vagaries of the human intellect. You lose your
sense of proportion and those in authority have got to maintain that sense
of proportion. Supposing I say to myself, okay, he gets so much. I’m
more important than him because I settled the whole system, therefore,
I should be paid ten times his, then there’s no end to it. So, we’ve got to
say, alright, this is what the chap at the lowest end gets. The foreign
worker who comes here, a domestic maid comes here and starts off with
S$300. You won’t get a Singaporean working for S$300 as a maid. You
get S$1,000 as a maid, maybe, part-time, one hour a day or two hours a
day. So, you’ve got to have a sense of proportion. A society will remain
cohesive only if there is a certain sense of equity and fair play. If I have
unbridled capitalism, winner takes all, like in America, and have an
underclass, I will find my minorities over-represented and the society
will be in jeopardy. They will riot.

“So, what do we do? We raised the levels of the losers. We give
them homes which they will not be able to buy, we give their children
equal education in schools they otherwise can’t afford, health services
and so on and so on and where they have lost jobs because the jobs
migrated and they were not educated enough to take the jobs that’s
coming that requires higher skills, all right, you take this job, his lower
pay, we make it up. Here is Workfare, give you the extra, but continue
work. If you stop working, we are giving you nothing. We want no
layabouts. You work, we make up. So, you find ingenious ways to
keep them working and sufficiently rewarded so that they feel they are
not abandoned and as a constant challenge and constant adjustment
during this period.”



The word "losers" did not only come from Wee Shu Min's, an 18-year-old
RJC student whose father is none other than AMK MP Wee Siew Kim, but
this time directly from the Old Man himself when describing common
Singaporeans!

So, we can now conclude this elitist culture has been inculcated upon the
young of the elite class, thinking that they are the only ones who have
the right to rule the country and the people. They are the winners and
we are the losers!

Sad, really very sad. The sign of decline is so clear now!
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the transcript, MM's definition of losers are quite specific. He refers them as those who are given free homes, free education, under workfare scheme.

Please confirm that there are people being given free homes.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For UMNO, volunteerism is long gone

This statement came from Zainon Ahmad, political editor of the English daily The Sun. He added that UMNO candidates lost the election simply because the supporters were clamouring for their share of the loot. If the money is not coming down to them, they stopped working. The UMNO supporters have viewed the candidates as all for themselves and struggling to amass wealth.

It is all money politics for personal wealth. And this kind of culture will bring down any party in any country. It is all a matter of timing.

Are we heading in the same direction? Some will say no with eyes wide shut. Some will argue that we have good honest men that came out to serve the country for noble reasons. And the people know that and can see that, and are indebted to our honest and honourable leaders. Of course there are others who stubbornly disagree. And of course many do not know which is which.
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panter92



Joined: 29 Feb 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For now, the PAP will still remain the political party in government. The Malaysians managed to deny the BN their two thirds majority simply due to the fact that the people are unhappy as well as the fact that the opposition parties united as one, even if it was fragile.

Even as I speak, the political situation now in Malaysia between the various opposition factions is escalating. This makes everything difficult for the country as uncertainty brews and factionalism increases.

Once the opposition parties have achieved a goal that once united them, it is inevitable that they break apart again.

Malaysia is a country, where like Singapore, it's constitution doesn't give much thought to opposition in parliament.

Compared to Singapore, I don't see that happening at all. Any opposition parties available are either split up or had their leaders overthrown. Such is the case for the SDP.

Let me talk about the SDA now. The SDA is made up of an alliance of opposition parties and are united with mainly the SPP playing the dominant role. They are under the leadership of the highly respectable politician Chiam See Tong. But, another question comes to mind. Can this party ever hope to remain united without the leadership of Chiam? After all, it was formed by Chiam and his associates. He only, too from the whole party alliance, holds a seat in parliament.

On the other hand, I feel that if there is one opposition party that will offer credible opposition, it will be the Workers Party. Low Thia Khiang and Sylvia Lim are both good politicians an their party has a long history all the way back to the time of David Marshall, Singapore's first Chief Minister. This party is still developing. It has the same ideology as the People's Action Party and thus, the social status in Singapore will not be changed as much.

So, to conclude, voting the SDA into power is the same as having a revolution occur in Singapore. Ideologies are not to be changed as and when a government please. Excessive changes will cause uncertainty, instability, and lack of trust and faith in the government. Without this trust, can Singapore ever proceed to face new challenges as a whole, united and resilient country?

I leave it to you people to decide.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Our opposition politicians are still ages behind the PAP. Many of the good men and women are still not with them. We need charismatic and dynamic people to stand up and front the opposition parties if they are going to make any significant impact at all.

Low Thia Khiang, Chiam See Tong and Sylvia Lim are good people but are uninspiring to attract better people into their parties. We will still have to wait a little while longer for the real stuff to appear in the political scene.
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Prince



Joined: 24 Jun 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

redbean wrote:
From the transcript, MM's definition of losers are quite specific. He refers them as those who are given free homes, free education, under workfare scheme.

Please confirm that there are people being given free homes.


Yes, you are right. His definition of "losers" is quite specific. Specifically meant for the "losers" who are given workfare instead of welfare. He simply means that everybody must work until he/she dies. No retirement, no relaxation, no take it easy staff.

This philosophy of his I have already seew it donkey years ago. His strategy was/is to make everyone work and work and work until you die but only a very few select ones and lucky ones would be able to get rich. Why? If one does not have time and financial freedom, one would not be able to get involve in politics rigorously and thereby become a threat to his precious flagship, the People-Acting-Party.

(Not "Action" because the politicians therein are not truly politicians; they are acting like politicians.)


Last edited by Prince on Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:37 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Prince



Joined: 24 Jun 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

panter92 wrote:
For now, the PAP will still remain the political party in government. The Malaysians managed to deny the BN their two thirds majority simply due to the fact that the people are unhappy as well as the fact that the opposition parties united as one, even if it was fragile.

Even as I speak, the political situation now in Malaysia between the various opposition factions is escalating. This makes everything difficult for the country as uncertainty brews and factionalism increases.

Once the opposition parties have achieved a goal that once united them, it is inevitable that they break apart again.

Malaysia is a country, where like Singapore, it's constitution doesn't give much thought to opposition in parliament.

Compared to Singapore, I don't see that happening at all. Any opposition parties available are either split up or had their leaders overthrown. Such is the case for the SDP.

Let me talk about the SDA now. The SDA is made up of an alliance of opposition parties and are united with mainly the SPP playing the dominant role. They are under the leadership of the highly respectable politician Chiam See Tong. But, another question comes to mind. Can this party ever hope to remain united without the leadership of Chiam? After all, it was formed by Chiam and his associates. He only, too from the whole party alliance, holds a seat in parliament.

On the other hand, I feel that if there is one opposition party that will offer credible opposition, it will be the Workers Party. Low Thia Khiang and Sylvia Lim are both good politicians an their party has a long history all the way back to the time of David Marshall, Singapore's first Chief Minister. This party is still developing. It has the same ideology as the People's Action Party and thus, the social status in Singapore will not be changed as much.

So, to conclude, voting the SDA into power is the same as having a revolution occur in Singapore. Ideologies are not to be changed as and when a government please. Excessive changes will cause uncertainty, instability, and lack of trust and faith in the government. Without this trust, can Singapore ever proceed to face new challenges as a whole, united and resilient country?

I leave it to you people to decide.



We "people"? So, what are you?
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