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Social and Economic Development in Singapore
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nkfsaga



Joined: 24 May 2006
Posts: 100

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2007 12:22 pm    Post subject: Social and Economic Development in Singapore Reply with quote

Social development

Social development is a process which results in the transformation of social structures. When this change is considered beneficial for a society, it may lead to social progress, otherwise it may lead to social decadence, decline, and eventually disintegration.

Social development does not encompass all change. For example, any city undergoes substantial "change" between 1.00 PM and 1.00 AM, when the majority of human activity gradually moves from a state of wakefulness and working to resting and sleeping. Such change simply reflects the functioning of the human social structure.

Economic development

Economic development is the development of the economic wealth of countries or regions for the well-being of their inhabitants. The study of economic development is known as development economics.

Economic development is a sustainable increase in living standards that implies increased per capita income, better education and health as well as environmental protection. Public policy generally aims at continuous and sustained economic growth and expansion of national economies so that 'developing countries' become 'developed countries'.

The economic development process supposes that legal and institutional adjustments are made to give incentives for innovation and for investments so as to develop an efficient production and distribution system for goods and services.

Economic development has evolved into a professional industry of highly specialized practitioners normally working in public-private partnerships that are sanctioned and many times at least partially funded by local, regional and state/provincial tax dollars. These economic development corporations function as individual entities and in some cases as departments of Singapore government.

Our government role is to seek out new economic opportunities and retain their existing business wealth. There is intense competition between communities and nations for new economic projects.

The creation and retention struggle is further intensified by the use of many variations of economic incentives to the potential business. These incentives vary greatly and can be highly controversial.

The measurement of success within this industry is normally job creation, economic growth and increased or retained tax base. There are more than 20,000 professional economic developers employed world wide in this highly specialized industry.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
Posts: 13465
Location: singapore

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Problems or Opportunities?

In many forums and blogs, the congestion and ERP rates are a perennial complain by everyone. There is a thread on how raising ERP rates at the CTE is not going to solve anything. Everyone is looking at the congestion as a problem. And it is true, a problem only to the motorists.

As a businessman, where making profit is the ultimate goal, the congestion in the CTE is a golden opportunity to make more money. If the govt is going to sell the CTE to a private operator, yes privatise it, I will be the first to bid for it. Then I will sit back and be a genuine toll collector.

Where is the problem? It is all opportunities to become rich if you can see it from a different angle.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mums calling the shot

Not enough babies? What is your problem? Forget about all the goodies or flexi hours, incentives etc. Just be real. Just pay us mums $100k each for 5 years for each child we produce. And we assure you that every cent you spent is worth it.

The children are the future of this country. Without children means no NS men, no one to look after the country and no one to look after the aged. And also no one to join the work force. See or not?

If the baby bust continues, Singapore will be no more. Now that is serious isn't it? And $500k for 5 years or $100k a year, that is cheap.

All the mums are waiting.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2007 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IMH in the red

Now this is unbecoming. It is time to relook at the costing and turn this around into a profit making organisation. IMH said it has 1,600 patients with 300 staying more than 10 years.

How about encouraging them to discharge early? Its $9 million budget is a big strain. What is the budget of NKF? Or what is the budget for Changi prison?

Should we also be worried about the high cost of operating a prison and turn in into a profit making organisation. Maybe they have already done that, with the prisoners working in some capacity. But hey, human rights groups would protest against selling their products.

I am trying to think whether it is a problem for the govt to subsidise IMH. Oooh, touching on something sensitive, subsidy or is there a better word for it? Some of these patients, like the chronically sick or disabled, may have families who can afford to pay for their upkeep. Some may have financial difficulties paying for their lifestyle.

Hmmm, terminating them, though a more efficient and practical solution, will definitely be unacceptable under any circumstances. So how? Maybe displaying them on TV and extract some emotional juice and sympathetic donations for their upkeep.

An exceptional talent is needed to look at how to look after them without stressing on the state budget. How much does it cost to subsidise the durians or to encourage sports as a lifestyle? Living as a mentally ill patient is a lifestyle not of choice. But it is a way of living to them.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stress and high stress a defensive weapon

Singaporeans are going bonkers because of high stress. And this is now a good reason, a respectable reason, to commit indiscretion.

One guy was caught on camera scratching his neighbour's mercedes. And his wife wrote to explain that he was having stress.

A consultant radiologist was found guilty of taking pictures of girls underwear with a mobile phone. His defence, yes, stress.

What else will Singaporeans do? What excuses will Singaporeans think off? Mental illness, compulsive behavior to steal, to molest?
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2007 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is the Singapore Brand?

Many people crow about the Singapore Brand. I am also proud of this brand. To me it means trustworthiness, reliability and peace of mind. Foreigners have this respect when they come to Singapore to do business or to do whatever. They know that this is a safe place, things are proper and orderly and predictable. The last thing they want to know is being cheated. That things don't work as expected.

Now, with some of the negative publicity we are getting, we are hearing Singaporeans happily throwing around the word 'caveat emptor.' Now what does that mean? It means that one has to be careful when in Singapore or when dealing with Singaporeans. And if you are cheated, it is your own problem because you never open your eyes.

Has Singapore or the Singapore Brand degenerate to this level when the trustworthiness and reliability are now not a given? And Singaporeans are happily going about it as if it is just the natural course of things to be in Singapore.

Actually I should have posted this under the topic, Signs of Decline.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2007 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another posh doggie restaurant

The dog food were very attractively prepared. Much much better than what one gets to eat in our food court. The dogs are living it up with their owners. Sometimes it is better to be a dog than a human bean.

It is good that human beans take great care for the animals they loved. Shower them with gifts, accessories, trinkets, jewelry etc. I can only say nice.

Somehow, after reading the article in the Sunday Times, I feel very uncomfortable. I got this feeling that it is very insensitive and a little sick.

That's just my feeling.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Segmentation of the Singapore society

We are truly unique in many ways. We can even segment the property market and believed that the price spiral in the top end market will not affect the property prices of the HDB market. We also believe that the enbloc sales will be isolated and HDB prices will not rise.

We believe. We just simply believe.

We also believe that the GST increases can be managed and control with our unique and efficient law enforcement system that small businesses will not pass the cost to the consumers. We believe that all the businesses will simply just charge 2% of the GST and all cost remains unchanged.

We also believe that the emperor is wearing his birthday suit, fully clothed.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it the fault of the CPF?

Let me look at the CPF from another angle and how it could be the source of other ills of our society. Traditionally children were the insurance of old age for parents. And children became a necessary item of all families. They are the provider for the parents when they are old and feeble and can no longer toil for a living.

What's that got to do with CPF? Yes, the CPF has become the substitute for children. People no longer depend on children for their old age. They have their own money to look after them. So no need to get married and have children. Does it make sense?

Why not? The CPF has unwittingly becomes a substitute and contribute to the no need to get hitch and no need to have children society. Now where have the children gone? Who cares?

This is only one social problem that the CPF may help to create. But the CPF can help to get rid of our oldies problem too. When the time comes, when all the oldies have a couple of hundred thousands in their CPF, and untouchable, what is the next best thing to do?

Cost of living is extremely high in this little island for the jobless. The few hundred dollars to be paid out by the CPF will only be good enough for subsistence level lifestyle. Why not take all out? Yes, denounce the citizenship, take out everything and migrate to a cheaper paradise. The oldies may find such an option a more desirable and practical way to spend their old age and their life long savings.

So the CPF will help to disperse our senior citizens around the world as rich old Singaporeans living out their golden years in wealth and in health. And our oldies and over crowding and welfare problems will be solved. Singapore will be forever young.

Is this part of a well thought out plan?
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Grunt



Joined: 10 Mar 2006
Posts: 373

PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Is this part of a well thought out plan?


Yes it is and the recommendation came some months back.


Quote:
The Singapore market was also too small for retirement villages to be commercially viable.

But the prospects have since changed.

With a rapidly ageing Singapore population, Mr Khaw said in five years' time, retirement villages will become economically viable.

One obstacle is the high costs of land in Singapore.

"My personal view is, our land is expensive. But we have nearby neighbours in Johore, Batam and Bintan. The elderly want to reach their doctors within half to one hour. So retirement villages in neighbouring countries is possible, barring the cross-border hassle. It is best to find cheap land on short leases," said Health Minister Khaw Boon Wan.


By Serene Loo and Julia , Channel NewsAsia | Posted: 17 April 2006 2124 hrs
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is still a good plan. Very pragmatic and efficient and solve a lot of social problems. Just a little devoid of human feelings. It looks damn good in terms of problem solving.

I better start to think which island I would want to be in. Laughing
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Circular logic - CPF

Swee Say said, later retirement and extension of withdrawal age is not to lock up your CPF money. And that is the truth. Another truth is that your money will be locked up for another 3 years. I am confuse as to which is the greater truth.

And this Michael Chwee said, 'If you want workers to work longer, we must have extra savings...' What is he talking? If a worker is employed to his last day of life, eg 85, he is expected to have a decent income till that day. Why should he need more savings? Only those that are not working and has no income need to have more savings. Once the retirement end is extened from 62 to 65, the workers are working 3 extra years, earning 3 more years of income. So his needed savings should go down by 3 more years.

Is this reasoning so difficult to understand?

And I am referring to people who are not working and have no income. Many may not be working but still have income. I do not buy the argument that the whole concept of filial piety or to take care of your parents, or just to give them a little pocket money are a total washout. If that is the case, our education has failed miserably and we should scrap teaching such concepts in schools immediately. It is a total waste of time and effort. A big farce. A big failure.
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is my money

When would Singaporeans start to ask the ministers in public dialogue sessions that the CPF money is their hard earned money and not to be managed against their wishes? It would be nice if they ask the minister, 'Mr Minister, Sir, what makes you think you can decide whatever you want to do with OUR money?'

And if the minister says that they have been elected by the people to decide what is good for them during the general election, then the people should accept it as they are the one who elected the ministers and MPs to Parliament. It was their choice, their right to decide who they want to represent them in Parlaiment.

Having cast their votes, they have to live with their choices. And for those who did not get to vote or voted against, just too bad. This is the system, and this is our democracy.
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Grunt



Joined: 10 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear legume

School teaching from being humble, respectful to filial piety all comes
to nought when we have fine and great leaders showing the way how
they reap and lead.

Who do not want that Million Dollar target and all the worldly materialistic
goals ..........
If parents are in the way they will go the way of the PA allowance.
Needs many hands .....
If the other siblings or kins are not helping then there is the good
government and the various charitable agencies.
Is it not, that the idea they are inculcating !
See the two merging as one.


See, she too agrees.......


June 23, 2007
Don't be too harsh on families who abandon kin

Quote:
THE article, 'Long-stay mental patients strain IMH' (ST, June 11), highlighting the plight of patients at the Institute of Mental Health who have been abandoned by their family, paints a sad story, placing the blame on irresponsible relatives and society in general.

Little does the reporter or the lay public know the burden of looking after a patient with chronic mental illness.

Mr Raymond Anthony Fernando's letter, 'Govt support needed to care for the mentally ill' (ST, June 22), is atypical only because he has chosen to shoulder his burden instead of dumping his wife at IMH.

By doing so, he sacrificed a significant portion of his life. His is not the worst-case scenario because his wife has recovered. For the families of mentally-ill patients who do not achieve a remission, the burden can be overwhelming.

While I do not condone the families abandoning their relatives at IMH, I can understand why they do so.

I would like to praise IMH for doing a great job in keeping these mentally-ill patients off the streets and giving them a decent quality of life. The alternative would be to deinstitutionalise these patients, as is the politically-correct policy in Western countries. This would result in many of the patients ending up as vagrants or bag-people, with maybe a few ending up in prison.

We need more chronic stay facilities, not just for chronic psychiatric patients but also adult patients with mental retardation and other handicaps who are now physically too big for their elderly parents to look after; likewise for demented patients who may be difficult to nurse at home.

While we would like the families to take on the care-giving responsibility, as a neurologist I have seen the lives of all the family members ruined by one ill relative, through no fault of their own.

Let's be realistic: If we find ourselves in the situation of these families, what would we do? If I were a patient, I would certainly not wish to burden my family or society. But as a 'First World' society, we owe our less-fortunate members a minimum quality of life with dignity.

Assoc Prof Lee Wei Ling


I too agree with her, seriously.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Grunt,

I say, this is a very balanced understanding from all three angles, the patients, the relatives and the govt. Only someone who have seen the tragedies will be able to look at the issues pragmatically but with some understanding and compassion.

And she suggested that the govt should bear some responsibilities to provide for such unfortunate individuals. What is the point of having a few hundred billions in the reserves if we stinged on such people but at the same time showered huge pay and bonuses to the already very rich?

It is really very tough for the seriously ill to be looked after by the families. Not only there is the financial burden but also the emotional stress and pains. As the govt, it cannot take a detached and arms length view of such problems facing the people and prioritised to have more champagne parties.
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