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World class public transport
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redbean



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SMRT’s bad luck just would not go away
When Khaw Boon Wan mentioned that it was bad luck that caused all the problems in SMRT, or something like that, many took it with a pinch of salt or laughed it away as market talk. How can technical problems be attributed to bad luck?
With each passing day, this bad luck thing seems to get more real. Whenever the media quoted Boon Wan or someone in the SMRT management claiming that services had improved, banged, something worst would happen, and the trains would suffer more breakdowns to press the point that it was not so, that the train services were not improving.
The point I am making about this bad luck thing is that it is not due to poor management or poor maintenance. Whatever maintenance processes they are doing, using high tech, big data, 3D printing or rocket science, if the breakdowns are due to bad luck, nothing will work. The SMRT staff is working very hard, I am very sure about that. Working hard is not the solution if they did not know what is the real problem. Worse if it is due to bad luck.
Perhaps a little divine intervention may help in some cases. From what Boon Wan had done, including inviting the religious leaders to pray to protection, it is still not working. Got blessing and things get even worse. It was just inconvenience, now people are getting hurt. Some said it was so lucky that no crowded train drove into the flood tunnel as the consequences of commuter drowning inside a flooded tunnel is beyond comprehension. So what can be worse than that? Would that be the end of the bad luck?
Fat hope. This morning, 15 Nov, one train collided with a stationary train in Joo Koon and 29 commuters were hurt as reported in main media, not fake news. This is first time in Singapore’s history, oops second time, that a train crashed into another train. Talking about bad luck! Sure this kind of accident must be bad luck. There is the train signal system to prevent such a collision. Could you believe it that it was the train signaling system that caused the accident? The train signaling system that was supposed to prevent such accident ‘was inadvertently removed’ when the train passed by a faulty signaling circuit. Holly cow, how can this be? Does anyone know how dangerous this is when trains are moving fast instead of this case when both were stationary and only a few metres apart? And this is a new train signaling system! How can a new train system have this kind of serious flaw embedded? This is totally unacceptable. A safety feature cannot and must not be allowed to be removed by accident or unintentionally even by a faulty circuit.
The most important thing now is to find the source of bad luck. Oh, also debug this new train signal software to make sure it is fit for operation. Many lives are put in danger if this bug is not removed completely and the system declared 100% safe for installation. As for the bad luck, if it is due to an individual, then the individual must be removed. This time big data can come in handy. Use big data to correlate the bad luck with some individual and remove the individual to remove the bad luck.
For a good start, all the top management staff and Boon Wan must go and bathe with flower water as a precaution.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 18, 2017 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to Third World Red Dot

Finally we have arrived at the dreaded third world that we have left a few decades ago. In the media, everyday without fail, there will be reports of train breakdowns, and now even accident that caused more than 30 people injured and needed medical treatment. Here are some samples of comments that were posted in Yahoo News.

Commuters travelling on the North-South Line on Wednesday evening (15 November) were advised to add 40 minutes of train travel time, rail operator SMRT said on social media.

Free one-way bridging bus services from Bishan to Yishun and free regular bus services between Bishan and Yishun in both directions were available, SMRT added in the tweet posted at 6.29pm.

“They (SMRT) have been saying that they’ve been upgrading… but this has been going on for at least one, two years already,” the shipbroker told Yahoo News Singapore.

Earlier on Wednesday morning, commuters on the SMRT-run East-West and Circle Lines were hit by delays.

There was also a train collision at Joo Koon station on the East West Line that injured 28 people.

The govt has invited Taiwan's rail operator, an organisation that was much younger than SMRT and has lesser years of experience in train operation and management, with their top management being paid a pittance compared to the millions SMRT is paying here, to help to solve our seemingly unsolvable problems of daily breakdowns. And here is what the Taiwan train president was reported to say in Channel News Asia.



With 117 stations, .... has a punctuality rate of close to 100 per cent, reporting fewer than 30 delays exceeding five minutes a year.

“We always plan ahead of all the maintenance operation procedures for every system, and execute thoroughly in order to ensure the system can operate smoothly, ” said B C Yen, president of Taipei Rapid Transit Corporation.

This requires proper training for maintenance staff, as well as strict controls on system parts thorough execution of construction works and material supplies and qualities in order to maintain the system’s stability, he added.

I am sure what the Taiwan train president said above is not rocket science and simply basic management processes in train management or in the management of any systems. We don't even do these things? We need to be told that this is how it should be done?

But this is not why I said Red Dot is now in the Third World. Look at this pic. Please view pic at www.mysingaporenews.blogspot.sg. This reminds me of the days when there were no computers and word processors and the secretaries were typing with manual typewriters. When there were errors, they either blanco it and typed over it or typed on another slip of paper, cut it and pasted over the errors. This is exactly what this sign board is all about. Third World starring at you in the 21st Century. My eyes popped out when I saw this. Unbelieveable that no one thinks this cut and paste thing is unacceptable except in the Third World. But it is happening and it has arrived!
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redbean



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Japan should stop sneering at our world class SMRT
An article in thenewpaper on 20 Nov by a SM Ong took offence at an apology issued by the Japanese MRT for a slight hitch in the departure of its train. SM Ong was incensed, felt insulted because the apology was not because the Japanese MRT had a ponding problem, not because their MRT had regular and frequent breakdown, not because their train had a collision. The apology was because their train departed a mere 20 seconds earlier than it was supposed to. How would 20 seconds affect the lives of the commuters? This is like a case of perfectionist mindset, a privilege only a perfectly efficient system can brag about. But they were not bragging, it is just their culture, something very different from our SMRT culture. Want to blame them for having an efficient culture?
By the way, the Japanese apology was reported in the Japanese media for Japanese consumption. How did it appear in our local media? Who did this and what was his agenda? If this is done by the Japanese, then it is right to feel offended for rubbing in on our serious train problems. But if the Japanese did not do it, instead it was done by a Singaporean or new Singaporean, or a local, then it is very unfair to blame the Japanese for it. It is misplaced anger that is typical of daft Singaporeans.
I quote SM Ong, ‘So we don’t need you, Japan, to make us feel worse about it. We don’t need your Japanese CEO of your Japanese car company Nissan to say last Friday that he will return part of his salary after an inspection scandal led to a recall of 1.2 million Nissan vehicles…Our transport minister, Mr Khaw, once said: “In Japan, the chairman, the CEO will call a press conference and take a deep bow, and in the good old days, they may even commit hara-kiri.”’
Now, aren’t this going too far and being overly sensitive? Actually we have a lot to learn from the Japanese if we adopt a healthy and positive mindset. We should be striving to be like the Japanese in terms of efficiency, be on time, not every day apologizing for delays and breakdowns. We should learn from their culture of accountability, failure to perform, return the salary for not performing, and…ok perhaps committing hara-kiri is demanding too much. Just simply resign may be an honourable thing to do.
This is a case of failure to see the real problem, refusing to see the problem and beating the messenger for bringing the bad news. This is our daft culture, a nation heading from first world to third world and behaving like third world people.
The decline is evident and very assured. And in the article SM Ong quoted Hsien Loong saying that our SMRT is among the top 4 cities in the world and Japan not even mentioned. Is this the same as bragging that our local universities are ranked among the best in the world while Japan’s are not so highly ranked, so we are better than Japan, our SMRT are better than Japan’s?
Oh my God. 无药可救. No medicine can help liao.
If one takes into consideration lightning strike and one SMRT train captain was injured, be mindful, be very mindful that HE is watching and obviously not happy with how things are developing. When the collision hit, I was asking what can be worse. Now lightning struck. What can be worse after this.
Someone suggested that commuters should think seriously of getting travel insurance. I hope no clown would jump onto this and suggest making this compulsory and using CPF money.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joo Koon collision – 10 sec to react
This is the excuse or explanation given on the train collision at Joon Koon. I don’t think this is a necessary exercise and the people should not try to pin the fault at the driver. Let me try to recreate the situation, just my thought and not necessary the whole truth. The train came to a stop as expected. Everything was normal and the driver could be trying to do something or may even try to stand up to open the door or to move from his seat. The driver would not expect that a train that had stopped would suddenly pull off on its own to hit a stationary train ahead. It never happened before and it was not meant to be like that. This is just abnormal, like a twilight zone event. No driver in his right mind would expect this to happen. So please leave the driver alone. The 10 sec was just too brief for him to react if he was off his seat or was doing something, maybe communicating with the station.
What was relevant to this accident in my view are three things. One, the merging of two software and hardware systems to work seamlessly as one. Was this fully understood, that the protocol and interfaces would work smoothly without problems? Were these tested fully to ensure that it would be the case before implementation?
Two, how could a lapse or fault cause a trip in the system for the software to read differently and malfunction?
Three, why was there such a thing as a 3 carriage train when all our trains are 6 carriages? A 6 carriage train must be the default programme, not a 3 carriage train. How did this 3 carriage train sneaked into the programme? This is a serious flaw in the system. Thales better explain.
Now, is this 3 carriage train programme completely removed and deleted from the system and would not be a source of another accident? There must be a full debugging of the software to rid this 3 carriage thing from the system. If this is not removed, it is going to cause another accident of the same nature sometime in the future. Murphy said so. This bug must be taken care of for good. It must not remain in the programme. Period.
My 2 cent worth commentary.
PS. While Thales, the French provider of the signaling system had apologized for the signaling fault that caused the accident, many sicko sinkies in TRE are still putting the blame on train carriages supposedly Made in China. Were these the cause of the accident? By the way, China’s high speed trains are criss crossing the Asia and African continent in the thousands daily. At those speed the quality of the train, the signaling system, the tracks, engines, maintenance etc etc the whole system are under real time test. Any faulty part or system would not stand the test of time. On record they have performed extremely well, for any minor mistake or fault would be blown out of proportion in the western media.
The Americans would be the next big customer of Chinese high speed trains when Trump decides to rebuild the ailing train system in the USA.
Oh by the way, are those injured compensated?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SMRT CEO needs more supervision
Whether he needs more supervision or more help it doesn’t matter. When an organization hires a CEO and pays him millions, top dollars, the least expected is that he must be able to do the job, if not, to even bring it to a higher level. What Cynical Investor wrote in the below article has his points. The article is reposted in the TRE with the title, ‘Wah lan SMRT CEO so cock is it?’
‘Scholar and ex-SAF commander is so useless that Khaw, Temasek and SMRT thinks he needs more supervision, a lot more….
If he’s so in need of supervision, why not fire him? Or cut his salary by half? Meritocracy? What meritocracy?...
Here’s how MediaCorp reported the story. ST’s report is along similar lines so maybe there was a dictator dictating the narrative?
‘Temasek-backed Pavilion Energy’s CEO Seah Moon Ming will step down to focus on his role as chairman of train operator SMRT.’ CNA
That shows that Temasek thinks he needs more supervision.’

The rot has gone down so deep that no one can see anything wrong with the appointment of Seah Moon Ming as full time chairman of SMRT when so many new hires, all being paid in the millions or a few hundred thousands each and still no improvement. Why pay so much for so little or non performance, and keeps on paying, and bringing bigger guns to be millions more? Is this Seah better than super fixer Khaw Boon Wan?
This is how bad things are now. No accountability, no responsibility, just keep throwing money at the problem like throwing money into a bottomless pit as if it is normal. This is the new normal of collecting million dollar salaries and enjoying life without a care of how things work or did not work.
What if Seah Moon Ming cannot produce any result, hire a few more millionaires?
This is unbelieveable.
The other unbelieveable thing is that no one cares how Desmond Kuek feels. Hey, he was the Chief of Defence Forces, commanding the Air Force, Navy, Army and all the supporting arms. He is no little spring chicken. He is someone proven to be able and capable. The fact that Boon Wan has to tackle the problems of SMRT is a smack on Desmond Kuek’s ability to handle the problems. The fact that after being on the job for 5 years and now they threw in another aged chicken as the full time chairman to solve the perennial unstoppable problems is another way to say Desmond Kuek needs help. KNN, being paid in the millions, ex Chief of Defence Forces needs help from two without any experience in running a mass rapid transport system. What do all these things say about the handling of this saga? I can’t fault Desmond Kuek for it as he was not really in charge. There are bigger cooks in the kitchen.
Appointing a top brass, presuming the best guy for the job, paid him millions and not allowing him to do the job, unbelieveable.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SMRT taken private - It is so funny
This was the reason for taking SMRT private last year, delisting from the SGX. “Taking SMRT private is part of our journey to support it in its focus to be among the very best in the world, through operational and engineering excellence.” It is so funny that I find it so hard to laugh. So now we have it, SMRT is going to be better, the best in the world by being a private company owned by the govt and run by the govt. If it stayed as a public listed company, it is not going to get anywhere near being the best in the world.
SMRT Chairman’s statement in 2001, … ‘However, whilst we aim at enhancing shareholder value, we maintain an unwavering focus on the core mission of providing safe, reliable, convenient, efficient and affordable transportation on the MRTsystem and the Bukit Panjang LRToperation. Reflecting this philosophy, we shall not skimp on training, maintenance, repair and overhaul expenditures, even as we address the containment of other expenses.’
The above statement was made in 2001 when SMRT was privatised into a public company listed in the Stock Exchange. This was different from the recent privatisation from a public listed company backed to a govt owned company. I know, the word privatisation is confusing. Privatising a govt owned company into a public listed company or a public company and then privatised a public company into a govt owned company.
What is more queer were the reasons given for the first privatisation. The mantra of the day was that a govt owned company could become more efficient and better run if it was privatised and run by private professionals, not civil servants, and run on the basis of profit making and be accountable to shareholders. This had an underlying assumption that civil servants were inept and thus the company needed to be privatised and run like public company.
The latest privatised privatised SMRT, the double speak is as what it was, confirmed that the previous mantra that a govt company privatised into a public company, I know it sounds funny, is not working. So a privatised public company now must be privatised into a govt owned company run by public/civil servants again.
Anyone see the contradiction? Another case of LPPL? Privatised into public company to be more efficient, now privatised a public company back to a govt owned and run company? Now you remember why the SMRT was privatised in the first place?
For this second privatisation to be working, it means that the old mantra was false, that civil servants could not run a govt owned/stats board company well. And the new mantra is that civil servants are good at running govt owned/stats board companies. No need to privatise to be efficient.
What do you think?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2017 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SMRT – A very bad deal for General Desmond Kuek
Nothing personal, but to volunteer to helm the SMRT is not a very wise thing to do for General Kuek. I think he must be regretting everyday, just like Boon Wan, for volunteering to solve the SMRT problems. The deep seated technical and engineering problems cannot be solved, would not go away just be replacing a few heads, just like the deep seated cultural problems.
Why would a clever man like Gen Kuek, the top man commanding the Armed Forces with a few hundred thousand men and women, and everyone has to ‘ta beh’ him in his presence, volunteered for a trouble infested train company? Why would someone who was used to walk around decorated like a Christmas tree during official functions, walking with the President during National Day parade, want to walk the railway tracks, to dirty himself and look like another average Singaporeans when no one has to ‘ta beh’ him anymore, when his words are no longer commands or orders to obey?
Today, everyone is poking at him for his failure to solve the train problems and to be pushed around by civilians that knew nothing more about the trains than him. When he was once almighty, now even ex NS men working in the SMRT would rant at him if they are not happy. It is a very bad decision, in my opinion, to volunteer for this job. To be kind to him, we should appreciate his bravery to answer the call of duty, to sacrifice himself in a mission that no wise men would volunteer.
Is there really a way to solve the train problems just by money, by hiring the best men for the job instead of putting round pegs into square holes and hope that miracles would happen? With the money SMRT is paying, it really can buy the best men available in the world for this job. No train company really pays their top men this kind of money. Why didn’t SMRT go around the world like the elites used to do when a top job is vacant, hire the best foreign recruitment agencies to round the world to headhunt the most qualified men for the job? There would be thousands lining up for this job and dying for it if they go globe hunting. And I mean real talents, not fakes with fake qualifications and degrees from you know where.
For the same money, even Obama would be queuing up to apply for the job. He would not smell this kind of money as President of the USA. Heads of States all over the world would not mind trying their luck at his job that apparently anyone can do. The money is so good.
How, when are they going to hunt another foreign talent for this job since Singaporeans have proven that they could not do it? Maybe another foreign fake would be able to fake that everything is fine if given the job. General Kuek should take on an ambassador position instead of being punished sitting on this chair.
Yes, brave man, brave soldier. I really feel sorry for him. From being an untouchable, now everyone is throwing mud, stones and rotten tomatoes at him.

Mary Christmas everyone. Oops, I mean Merry Christmas.
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redbean



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Murphy’s Law must be respected
‘According to the latest Facebook post by Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan, trains running in opposition directions will share a single tunnel under the new software program. It is unknown how far into testing the new system has been, but a glitch may result in a disastrous collision between two trains travelling in opposite direction. Singapore trains travel up to 80km/h in the tunnels….
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said he wants to save time to repair one tunnel during operational hours while the other carry commuters….
“Last night, I joined them on the tracks. They showed me how the new Thales signalling system has made single-line operations possible for the NSL. Simply put, trains travelling in both directions are now able to use a single tunnel while the other tunnel is closed for maintenance works. This flexibility gives us another option when planning our works, to minimise inconvenience to commuters. This was not possible under the old signalling system.”’
The above was reported in thestatestimesreview highlighting a potential and very dangerous situation that train commuters are going to be exposed to. According to Murphy’s Law, what can happen will happen, a slightest flaw that could lead to a major accident would lead to a major accident. In a train system that provided for two trains travelling in opposite direction on the same track invites a human made disaster, a disaster caused by the arrogance of man. There are a thousand and one thing that could happen to cause an accident. All nuclear power stations are made not to fail but failed they did. Can this train system be an exception?
Boon Wan once lamented that our train system was built without careful consideration and planning like those in Britain. Now that we have the time and resources to do the best, to make sure all things are considered, should we take this risk for an accident to happen that could cause colossal destruction of lives? It is not a case of it would not happen, Thales system will work. Murphy’s Law said that whatever can happen would happen. Trust me, it will happen. This is unacceptable risk, unbearable risk, unthinkable risk that must be avoided at all cost. This is the same kind of thinking that Singapore can house a nuclear power station. Nothing will happen, absolutely sure?
The stupidity of human arrogance leaves no bound.
PS. Heard of human error, system malfunction, hacking, act of God, sabotaged, negligence, dereliction of duty, terrorism, or forgetfulness, etc etc?
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redbean



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2018 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is the SMRT a poison chalice?
This is the question posed by a Dr Lee Siew Peng in a letter of encouragement to the new CEO Neo Kian Hong. This is the first para of the article posted in TRE.
“Dear Mr Neo
I trust that “Congratulations” are in order for your new appointment. Some people see this job as a kind of poisoned chalice. Hopefully your big risk will lead to big rewards. Not just for you, but for the Singapore travelling public.”

If one were to look at the records of SMRT, from the performance of the train system and the fate of its CEOs and whoever foolishly thought it was wise to dabble with the organisation, the poison chalice suggestion is not too far from the truth. It was not like that when it was built in the 1980s. It had a fair ride for a couple of decades and the pride of Singapore, something that we could boot about.
Thanks to the man behind this train, past President Ong Teng Cheong. Could anyone attempt to trace the change in fortune of the SMRT from the demise of the late President and see if there is any correlation in the two events?
The reputation of the SMRT was at its peak during the tenure of Saw Phaik Wah, then CEO. It was reporting big profits year after year and she was the toss of the SMRT party when they carried her around like Cleopatra to recognise her great contribution and her greatness.
Alas, this was not to last, like the proverbial saying, pride before the fall. Everything fell apart after that infamous Company Dinner and Dance. It was like a house of cards, or a house built on straw or mud. How could the problems sprouted out so fast and so drastically that daily breakdown became a norm and multiple times a day. And on several occasions practically the whole system was run to a stop for several hours. And then accidents came one after another with two technicians killed on the track while on a training stint. And this was not all, fore the second time, after several decades, the trains collided, oops, it was reported that they came into contact with each other, and tens of people were hurt. Luckily no serious injuries.
What about the CEOs, Saw Phaik Wah had left. Her successor Desmund Kuek is leaving. Khaw Boon Wan’s reputation as a trouble shooter and the man to solve all problems is in tatters, unable to do much to the problems that kept cropping out in the system despite human and financial resources being poured into the SMRT.
Don't forget the several ministers that had to leave quietly after their bad stint in the ministry.
And a few day’s back, the army colonel brought in by Desmund Kuek is also in the news for all the wrong reasons, arrested for drink driving in the wee hours of the morning. What else can go wrong to the SMRT and its top management?
Neo Kian Hong is taking over the chalice from Desmund Kuek. Would it be confirmed that it is really a poison chalice? Should someone be praying or burning more incense to appease the spirits to take away the poison in the chalice? From the noises in the social media, it looks like Neo is standing on weak sand.
Perhaps a sai kong or bomoh or witch or whatever maybe welcomed if they can turn the poison chalice to a bowl of red wine. Are the problems of SMRT over? Maybe they should be looking for someone that is blessed to helm this organisation. A lucky fool may be good for the time being.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Singaporeans are getting richer, not taking public transport
SMRT announced that it had made the first loss after years of profit making to the tune of $86m in FY2018. Among the reasons given for the loss were “higher maintenance staff costs, parts and material costs, depreciation of rail assets and other rail maintenance related operating expenses.” And another big item, falling ridership.
Operating expenses gone up from $785m to $838m or up $53m. Revenue fell from $791m to $743m or down $48m. Squaring these two items would see a loss of $101m ($53m + $48m). To end up with a net loss of $86m would mean that there were profits coming from other non train operations like rentals or extraordinary items.
Let’s look at the numbers again. In 2017, revenue($791m) less expenses($785m) should give a profit $6m. Similarly for 2018, revenue($743m) less expenses($838m) should give a loss of $95m. Presumably these numbers did not include other non train operations. But this is not true given the data in the above paragraph that show a difference of $15m ($101-$86m). In 2017, SMRT declared an after tax profit of $26m, thus saying the non train operation profit was $20m. Extrapolating the data, non train operation profit also fell from $20m to $15m.
Data can be very confusing indeed.
Another interesting number is that SMRT made $81m after tax profit in 2016, $26m after tax profit in 2017 and now $86m loss in 2018. What contributed to the big turnaround in numbers? Falling ridership? High maintenance expenses?
What is surprising is the announcement of falling ridership despite the population rising every month and moving towards the 6.9m number. Why the rise in population did not turn into more ridership? Perhaps the new citizens and immigrants were of the rich type, the millionaires or billionaires, so they did not take public transport. But his is unlikely the case given that most of the new arrivals were poor jobless third world type coming here to steal the jobs of citizens. So they were more likely to take public transport than buying private cars that cost a bomb that many Singaporeans too could not afford.
Then again this could be untrue and could point to the fact that Singaporeans were getting richer and so could afford private cars and thus no need to take public transport.
The other possibility was that the cost of private transport had gone up so much while income fell as more and more Singaporeans became unemployed or underemployed and thus could not afford to take public transport. Thus ridership of public transport like trains fell accordingly.
But then again, given the number of happy and contented Singaporeans posting how happy they were with their lives and incomes, I must conclude that more Singaporeans are getting richer and going back to take private transport instead of public transport.
Or could it be due to the pervasive influx of bicycle sharing companies that Singaporeans were taking to bicycles or Grabs and Ubers? When one becomes a Grab or Uber one actually has the privilege of owning a private car to move around.
What do you think?
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What has stupidity has no cure got to do with ride hail ride companies?
China is conducting a nation wide inspection of all ride hailing companies after a passenger was raped and murdered after calling a ride from Didi. It always needs a painful lesson for people to wake up. But for the stupidity has no cure type, no amount of lessons would change their thinking and way of life unless it affects them personally.

China is in a way quite homogeneous other than the autonomous regions. They too are quite homogeneous in their own ways. Any foreigner or stranger to their provinces would be noticeable. In Red Dot, when more than 50% of the residents are foreigners, with a large number of foreigners given citizenship, everyone is a stranger and no longer raise the red flag.

With ride hailing companies, and with taxis allowing locals, ie foreigners and new citizens to drive taxis, are there risk to personal security? Our strawberry generations are happily jumping into taxis and Grab rides without a single thought on who is the driver and his background. Singapore is very safe and safety is being taken for granted, not only by the strawberry generations but by parents and the govt.

The strangers, now locals, that were brought in are totally unknown elements, just like the maids. And they are given the right to drive our people, children and women in their cars to anywhere they like, and the maids are trusted to take care of our olds and babies with very little supervision, and to live in the homes. What kind of people are they, any psychiatric, psychopathic or mental problems, terrorist connections, paedophiles, sex maniacs, people with questionable morality and criminals?

The lackadaisical ways we go about allowing these foreigners to come in and live with us, and mingle with us like one of us is scary if one has any sense of fear and safety concerns. The exception clause always applies to Singapore. It would not happen here. We are very safe, very well governed. The foreigners we brought in are good people. They don't commit crimes, only Singaporeans commit crimes.

Good luck to the stupidity has no cures.
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what i posted is just my personal view. feel free to disagree.
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